Public documents

Malta

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Malta

Article 24(1)(a) - languages accepted by the Member State for the public documents to be presented to its authorities pursuant to point (a) of Article 6(1)

The languages accepted by Malta are Maltese and English.

Article 24(1)(b) – an indicative list of public documents falling within the scope of this Regulation

The indicative list of the public documents falling within the scope of this Regulation is as follows: birth certificate, free status certificate, marriage certificate, civil union certificate, death certificate and conduct certificate.

Article 24(1)(c) – the list of public documents to which multilingual standard forms may be attached as a suitable translation aid

The public documents to which a standard multilingual form may be attached as a translation aid are the birth certificate, free status certificate, marriage certificate, civil union certificate, death certificate and conduct certificate. The documents certifying capacity to marry and capacity to enter into a civil union are one and the same, known as the free status certificate.

Article 24(1)(d) – the lists of persons qualified, in accordance with national law, to carry out certified translations, where such lists exist

As Malta does not recognise translators as professionals with a warrant, it does not have a list of persons qualified to carry out certified translations. In the absence of a legal framework for translators, the Ministry for Foreign Affairs and Trade Promotion (MFTP) has a system for the registration of the signatures of persons who carry out translations. This database of signatures is not for public use but is only for use by the MFTP to confirm and compare the signatures of persons who carry out translations. More information can be found at: https://foreignaffairs.gov.mt/en/Pages/Authentication-of-Documents.aspx

The Ministry for Justice, Culture and Local Government also has a list of interpreters and translators, published at http://www.justiceservices.gov.mt/courtservices/CourtExperts/default.aspx, which can be used as a reference.

Article 24(1)(e) – an indicative list of types of authorities empowered by national law to make certified copies

It is standard practice for lawyers/notaries to make copies of public documents as certified copies of original public documents. It is at the discretion of the body requesting the documents to decide whether or not to accept copies. Certified copies of other public documents can also be issued by the Courts of Justice.

Article 24(1)(f) – information relating to the means by which certified translations and certified copies can be identified

Certified copies of other documents normally include a statement attesting that the document is a certified copy, and the stamp and signature of the person empowered to issue a certified copy. Certified translations bear the date, signature and stamp of the translator.

Article 24(1)(g) – information about the specific features of certified copies

Certified copies of other documents normally include a statement attesting that the document is a certified copy, and the stamp and signature of the person empowered to issue a certified copy.

Last update: 03/12/2019

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

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