Costs

Cyprus

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Cyprus

Regulatory framework governing fees of legal professions

Legal practitioners are not divided into different categories in the Republic of Cyprus (i.e. solicitors, barristers, advocates and lawyers). All legal practitioners entered in the Register of Advocates have equal rights to appear in the national courts and to practise law in general. This applies regardless of if an advocate holds the title of solicitor or barrister abroad. The term used for all legal practitioners is ‘advocate’.

Advocates (Δικηγόροι)

Fees for legal services are set on the basis of a scale of court costs approved by the Supreme Court (Ανώτατο Δικαστήριο).

For out-of-court services, there are scales which set the minimum legal fee.

In both cases, the advocate can agree on a higher fee with the client.

In the case of court cases, this must be officially declared.

There are two categories of bailiffs in Cyprus:

  1. Private-sector bailiffs, who serve court documents.
  2. Court bailiffs, who are civil servants charged with completing procedures to enforce court judgments (e.g. orders to seize and sell movable property).

Fees for private-sector bailiffs to serve documents are calculated on the basis of the distance of the address for service.

Court bailiffs are civil servants and are paid a monthly salary. Litigants who apply for enforcement measures to be taken pay the state stamp duty in an amount set out in rules of procedure, which depends on the type of enforcement measure and the amount which they are seeking to collect.

Prescribed fees

Prescribed fees for civil proceedings

Prescribed fees for litigants in civil proceedings

Initial costs for court fees are prescribed on the basis of the scale of the petition or some other procedure and are paid when the petition is filed. Court fees are not prescribed as a specific sum; they depend on how the case proceeds and are calculated on the basis of an approved scale.

Stage of civil proceedings at which prescribed fees must be paid

The initial costs for court fees are paid when the petition is filed.

Prescribed fees in criminal proceedings

Prescribed fees for litigants in criminal proceedings

If the accused is convicted, he may be ordered to pay the cost of the proceedings. As a rule this is avoided where a prison sentence is handed down, in which case costs are paid by the state, as they are where the accused is acquitted.

Stage of criminal proceedings at which prescribed fees must be paid

Costs, less initial costs paid in the form of stamp duty when the case is filed, are paid at the end of the proceedings.

Prescribed fees in constitutional proceedings

Prescribed fees for litigants in constitutional proceedings

Costs are calculated on the basis of the relevant scale.

Stage of constitutional proceedings at which fees must be paid

Fees are paid at the end of the proceedings, with the exception of court costs, which are paid when the recourse is filed.

Prior information to be provided by legal representatives

Rights and duties of parties

Advocates’ duties towards clients are listed in the Code of Conduct Regulations of Advocates 2002 (Οι περί Δεοντολογίας των Δικηγόρων Κανονισμοί του 2002) (Government Gazette of the Republic, Annex C(1) No 237 of 17.5.2002 (Regulatory Administrative Act 237/2002).

Costs sources

Where can I find information on costs sources in Cyprus?

The most important costs sources are listed on the website of the Supreme Court.

The information provided is in Greek.

Where can I find additional information on costs?

Available website on cost information:

Website of the Supreme Court.

Where can I find information on the average length of time that different procedures take?

Statistics on work carried out by the courts of the Republic of Cyprus can be found on the website of the Supreme Court in Greek and in English.

Value Added Tax

How can I obtain relevant information?

Advocates’ fees are subject to VAT at 15%, provided that the advocate providing the services is registered for VAT.

What rate applies?

The rate of VAT is 15%.

Legal aid

Income limit applicable in civil proceedings

There is no legal aid in civil proceedings.

Income limit applicable in criminal proceedings for defendants

Defendants in criminal proceedings are entitled to free legal aid if their income is insufficient to pay for the services of an advocate and the court considers that the free legal aid granted is in the interests of justice. There is no predefined income limit. The court examines the application based on all the evidence, including a report prepared by the Department of Social Welfare Services (Τμήμα Υπηρεσιών Κοινωνικής Ευημερίας) on the defendant’s income and requirements.

Income limit applicable in criminal proceedings for victims

As a rule criminal proceedings are instituted not by the victim of the crime but by the State, which pays the relevant costs. There is therefore no provision for free legal aid for victims.

Other preconditions to legal aid for victims

As a rule criminal proceedings are instituted not by the victim of the crime but by the State, which pays the relevant costs. There is therefore no provision for free legal aid for victims.

Other preconditions to legal aid for defendants

According to the relevant legislation, the offence of which the accused stands charged must be punishable by a term of imprisonment of at least 12 months in order to qualify for legal aid. However, the provision in question has been deemed unconstitutional and, as a result, it should be assumed that the facility for free legal aid exists in all cases.

When does the losing party have to pay the winning party’s costs?

As a rule, the losing party pays the other side’s costs, although the question of costs is at the discretion of the court, which may order otherwise.

Related Links

Court fees and costs

Statistical data (Greek)

Statistical data (English)

Related Attachments

Cyprus report on cost transparency study PDF (555 Kb) en

Last update: 23/07/2019

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

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