Victims' rights - by country

You are considered a victim of crime if you have been the victim of an act or omission which constitutes a crime according to Finnish law. As a victim of crime, you have certain rights before, during and after court proceedings.

Criminal proceedings in Finland start with a pre-trial investigation, usually conducted by the police. During this stage, it will be established whether or not an offence has actually been committed, under what circumstances it occurred and the identity of the parties concerned. The extent of the injury or damage caused by the offence and your claims as a victim will also be examined.

If there is sufficient evidence that a criminal act was committed, the prosecutor will file charges and bring the case to court. During the trial, the court examines the evidence and either convicts the alleged offender or finds them not guilty. The criminal proceedings may continue if one of the parties lodges an appeal with a higher court.

The following links will provide you with relevant information.

1 - My rights as a victim of crime

2 - Reporting a crime and my rights during the investigation or trial

3 - My rights after trial

4 - Compensation

5 - My rights to support and assistance

Last update: 04/02/2021

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

1 - My rights as a victim of crime

What information will I get from the authority after the crime occurred (e.g. police, public prosecutor) but before I even report the crime?

The Link opens in new window'Rights of a crime victim' brochure, published by the Finnish Ministry of Justice, provides information on matters that crime victims are entitled to be informed about by the authorities. The brochure briefly explains matters such as how to report a crime, victim support services, legal aid, the possibility of obtaining protection, how to seek compensation, the right to interpretation and translation of documents, and mediation in criminal cases. The printable brochure is intended for distribution to victims and to support communications, particularly in the work of the police and other criminal investigation authorities. The brochure can also be used by judicial authorities, victim support services and others who come into contact with crime victims.

The information given to victims may vary according to their needs, personal circumstances and the type or nature of the crime.

I don’t live in the EU country where the crime took place (EU and non-EU citizens). How are my rights protected?

You may be provided with support and advice even if the offence has been committed in another country. If you have become the victim of a crime in another EU Member State, the criminal investigation authority may, in certain cases, transfer your report of the crime or an already initiated pre-trial investigation to the authorities of another EU Member State. This may be possible, for example, if the offence is serious or if you have not been able to report the crime in the state where it was committed. With serious offences, transfer outside the EU can also be considered.

If you are a victim of human trafficking, you are entitled to the services of the Assistance system for victims of human trafficking even if the crime was committed in another country. The prosecutor decides whether or not to open a pre-trial investigation into a suspected offence involving human trafficking in Finland.

If I report a crime, what information will I receive?

The police and other criminal investigation authorities will provide you with information on victim support services, how to report a crime, legal aid, the possibility of obtaining protection, how to seek compensation, the right to interpretation and translation services, mediation in criminal cases, the right to obtain information on the hearing of the case, the right to be notified of the release of the offender from prison or pre-trial detention, how to file a complaint about the conduct of the authorities, the procedure for crime victims not residing in the country where the criminal offence was committed, and contact details for any questions related to the case. These rights are described in the Link opens in new window'Rights of a crime victim' brochure.

The information outlined above may not necessarily be provided when you report the crime, especially if you report the crime electronically. The police will inform you about these rights when you are being interviewed. The investigation authority will always inform you if your report does not lead to a pre-trial investigation or in the event that the pre-trial investigation is discontinued or closed.

Am I entitled to free interpreting or translation services (in my dealings with the police or other authorities, or during the investigation and trial)?

You have the right to use Finnish or Swedish during the pre-trial investigation and trial. If you are a Sámi, you have the right to use the Sámi language within the Sámi Homeland. The authorities must provide interpreting services as needed. If you do not speak the official languages of Finland, you have the right to use a language that you know in any situations relating to the investigation of the crime. If necessary, the authorities must arrange interpretation into a language that you know. The authorities must also arrange interpretation during the investigation and trial if you are a sign language user or if you need interpretation due to a sensory or speech defect. The interpreter has an obligation of secrecy. The interpreter's fee is paid by the state.

You may request a translation of certain key documents. An oral translation may be provided if a written translation of the document is not required for your legal protection. In some cases, you may be provided with only a partial translation or a summary of the document.

During the pre-trial investigation, you have the right to receive a translation of the written confirmation of your report of the offence, a decision to discontinue the investigation and, if necessary, any other document essential to the case. From the prosecutor, you may obtain a translation of a decision not to prosecute.

In court, you have the right to receive a translation of the judgment, a notice concerning the time and place of the court session and, if necessary, any other document essential to the case.

How do the authorities ensure that I understand them and that I am understood by them (if I am a child; if I have a disability)

The authorities must ensure that interpretation services are available during the pre-trial investigation and trial if you are a sign language user or if you need interpretation due to a sensory or speech defect.

The 'Rights of a crime victim' brochure is also available in easy-to-understand language. The 'If You Become a Victim of a Crime' brochure is available in both easy-to-understand language and in sign language.

Investigators of crimes against children have received special training, including how to interact with and interview a child in criminal proceedings. In certain cases, the child may also be interviewed by a psychologist specialised in interviewing children.

Victim support services

Who provides victim support?

You may need medical assistance or other social welfare and healthcare services, such as emergency social services, hospital treatment or physical and mental rehabilitation. You may use these services under the same conditions as all other clients.

Many organisations provide support, advice and guidance to crime victims. Link opens in new windowVictim Support Finland (Rikosuhripäivystys) provides assistance for all types of crimes and criminal proceedings as well as advice relevant to the rights of victims. If you are a victim of domestic violence, you can seek protection and support from shelters. In some localities, special support is available for victims of sexual offences and immigrant women. There is a separate assistance system for victims of human trafficking. You can access these services under certain conditions.

You can contact the support services even if you do not report the crime. With your consent, the police or another criminal investigation authority may forward your contact details to a support service, which will then contact you.

Will the police automatically refer me to victim support?

If you need special protection or if otherwise required by the nature of the crime or your personal circumstances, the police will, with your consent, forward your contact details to a support organisation. The police should tell you about the support available for victims of human trafficking and, with your consent, propose that you be admitted to the Assistance system for victims of human trafficking.

How is my privacy protected?

In order to protect your privacy, the court may, under certain conditions, hear the case without the presence of the public and order the trial documents and judgment to be kept secret to the extent necessary. You may request this from the court. The court may in some cases also order your identity to be kept secret. This applies to crimes such as sexual offences.

Do I have to report a crime before I can access victim support?

No, you do not.

Personal protection if I’m in danger

What types of protection are available?

In some cases, you may be questioned in the trial behind a screen, via a video link or without the offender or public being present. When being questioned, you may in some cases be video-recorded and the recording may then be used as evidence in the trial, for example if you are under 18 years of age.

In order to protect your privacy, the court may, under certain conditions, hear the case without the presence of the public and order the trial documents and judgment to be kept secret to the extent necessary. You may request this from the court. The court may in some cases also order your identity to be kept secret. This applies to crimes such as sexual offences.

The court will always consider the trial arrangements and protection measures on a case-by-case basis, taking into account the fact that the rights of the defence must not be restricted. The decision of the court may thus differ from an earlier assessment.

In seriously threatening situations, you may request the non-disclosure of your contact details, non-disclosure for personal safety reasons, a restraining order or even the change of your name or personal identity code. In the most serious cases, you may be admitted to a witness protection programme. Further information is available from the authorities or support services. If you are protected by a restraining order and move to another EU Member State and also feel in need of protection there, you can request the court that issued the original restraining order to issue a European Protection Order.

If you are a victim of domestic violence or you are at risk, the authorities may jointly draw up a safety plan for you as part of a Multi-Agency Risk Assessment Conference (MARAC).

If you are a victim of human trafficking, you have the right to safe accommodation, which may involve special security arrangements at different levels to ensure safe housing for you. In more serious situations, your safety can be ensured in a special safe accommodation unit, as well as through technical equipment or security services. In the most serious situations, you may be admitted to a witness protection programme. The Assistance system for victims of human trafficking is operated by the authorities and, if necessary, will be used to help the police protect you.

Who can offer me protection?

The police will assess your need for protection and the measures required if you are under threat. The authority deciding on protection will depend on the measures in question (see above). Further information on protection measures is available from the authorities or victim support services.

Will someone assess my case to see if I am at risk of further harm by the offender?

The authorities will assess your specific protection needs during the pre-trial investigation and trial as well as determine the required protection measures. The purpose of the protection measures is to protect you from additional suffering, intimidation or retaliation during the investigation and trial. The assessment will be carried out together with you, taking into account your personal characteristics and circumstances as well as the nature of the crime.

Will someone assess my case to see if I am at risk of further harm from the criminal justice system (during the investigation and trial)?

The authorities will assess your specific protection needs during the pre-trial investigation and trial as well as determine the required protection measures. The purpose of the protection measures is to protect you from additional suffering, intimidation or retaliation during the investigation and trial. The assessment will be carried out together with you, taking into account your personal characteristics and circumstances as well as the nature of the crime.

What protection is available for very vulnerable victims?

In seriously threatening situations, you may request the non-disclosure of your contact details, non-disclosure for personal safety reasons, a restraining order or even the change of your name or personal identity code. In the most serious cases, you may be admitted to a witness protection programme. Further information is available from the authorities or support services.

I am a minor – do I have special rights?

If you are a minor (under the age of 18), you are a vulnerable victim and may therefore need special protection measures. You may be protected by having your interview video-recorded during the investigation, for example, and the recording then being used as evidence in the trial.

If you are a minor, you may be entitled to legal aid at the expense of the state. If your guardian is suspected of having committed an offence against you, a substitute for that guardian must be appointed for you for the criminal proceedings.

If you are a minor victim of human trafficking, you have the right to the services of the Assistance system for victims of human trafficking. If you are a child victim of human trafficking without a residence permit, a representative will always be appointed for you if you are in Finland without a guardian or other legal representative. If you are a child victim of human trafficking and you are a Finnish citizen or hold a residence permit, a substitute for a guardian can be appointed for you. If the criminal investigation is initiated in Finland, as a minor, you may be entitled to a state-funded legal counsel.

My family member died because of the crime – what are my rights?

When a crime results in the victim’s death, the victim’s family members, as defined by law, are in the position of an injured party, i.e. the victim. They will then have the same rights as other victims of crime.

My family member was a victim of crime – what are my rights?

The victim’s family members also have access to victim support services.

A minor child of a trafficked person in Finland may also be included in the Assistance system for victims of human trafficking.

Can I access mediation services? What are the conditions? Will I be safe during mediation?

Mediation can be used in criminal matters if both the victim and the suspected offender consent to it. Additional requirements are that the suspect confirms the general course of events and that mediation is in the best interests of the victim. Mediation is free of charge, confidential and always voluntary, and you may choose to end it at any stage. Trained voluntary mediators help the parties in a criminal case to discuss the event and agree on compensation for possible loss or damage caused by the offence. This service is available at mediation offices across the country.

The parties involved in mediation usually have the right to counsel or a support person at the mediation meetings. The mediators, under the guidance of professionals, will assess and ensure safe contact between the parties to the conflict and may, if necessary, suspend the process. Mediation must be suspended if either party withdraws their consent or there is reason to believe that consent has not been freely given.

Where can I find the laws stating my rights?

Key laws on victims’ rights in criminal proceedings include the Criminal Investigations Act (Esitutkintalaki, 805/2011) and Criminal Procedure Act (Laki oikeudenkäynnistä rikosasioissa, 689/1997). The right to assistance for victims of human trafficking is governed by the Act on the Reception of Persons Applying for International Protection and on the Identification of and Assistance to Victims of Trafficking in Human Beings (Laki kansainvälistä suojelua hakevan vastaanotosta sekä ihmiskaupan uhrin tunnistamisesta ja auttamisesta, 746/2011). These and other laws can be found online Link opens in new windowhere.

Last update: 14/10/2018

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

2 - Reporting a crime and my rights during the investigation or trial

You are a party to court proceedings if you request punishment or compensation for a criminal offence. You may also be questioned for the purpose of hearing evidence.

If the prosecutor has decided not to prosecute, you have the right to bring charges yourself.

How do I report a crime?

You can report a crime to the police at the crime scene, at a police station or, in the case of minor offences, online or by phone. You have the right to receive a written confirmation of your crime report.

How do I find out what’s happening with the case?

The police will provide you with contact details for following up on the case.

Am I entitled to legal aid (during the investigation or trial)? Under what conditions?

You have the right to the assistance of a legal counsel for reporting a crime, being questioned and at the trial. The counsel must be a lawyer, public legal aid attorney or licensed legal counsel.

Low- and middle-income earners may be entitled to state-funded legal aid. In such cases, the counsel's fee will be paid by the state in part or in full. You can apply for legal aid to a public legal aid office or through an electronic service. You can also ask law firms to apply for legal aid on your behalf.

The court can order legal counsel and a support person for you in the case of domestic violence, sex offences or serious offences against your life, health or liberty. In such cases, the state will pay for the fee regardless of your income.

Can I claim expenses (for taking part in the investigation/trial)? Under what conditions?

If you are summoned to appear before the court in order to clarify the facts in the case, you are entitled to receive travel expenses incurred in your attendance at court from the State. You may receive a daily allowance, travel expenses and compensation for financial loss.

Can I appeal if my case is closed before going to court?

A complaint about the prosecutor's decision not to prosecute can be submitted to the Prosecutor General, who has the right to serve a new indictment.

Can I attend the trial?

Yes, you may attend the trial as a party to the proceedings. You are a party to court proceedings if you request punishment or compensation for a criminal offence. You may agree with the prosecutor's summary penal order or request some other penalty. You may seek compensation from the defendant yourself, or the prosecutor may have pursued the claim on your behalf.

What is my official role in the justice system? For example, am I or can I choose to be: a victim, witness, civil party or private prosecutor?

You are a party to court proceedings if you request punishment or compensation for a criminal offence. You may also be questioned for the purpose of hearing evidence.

If the prosecutor has decided not to prosecute, you have the right to bring charges yourself.

What are my rights and obligations in this role?

You may be obliged to appear in court in person if this is necessary to clarify the facts in the case. In this case, you are entitled to compensation from the state for the costs incurred.

During the trial, you must always tell the truth.

Can I make a statement during the trial or give evidence? Under what conditions?

If you are a party to the proceedings, you have the right to give evidence. At the main hearing, you will be able to present your claim and its grounds, give evidence and make a final statement, in which you can state your opinion regarding the defendant’s guilt and the penalty to be imposed.

What information will I receive during the trial?

You will be summoned to the main hearing if your presence is necessary to clarify the facts in the case or if you have told the court that you intend to present claims that are not pursued by the prosecutor.

You have the right to be informed, at your request, of the time and place of the court hearing as well as the verdict given in a criminal case.

Will I be able to access court files?

Yes. If you are a party to the proceedings, you have the same right to access court files as the accused. As a rule, you have the right to be informed about the content of trial documents, even those that are not in the public domain.

Last update: 14/10/2018

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

3 - My rights after trial

Can I appeal against the ruling?

You can appeal against the ruling of a district court (käräjäoikeus) before a court of appeal (hovioikeus). As a general rule, you will need a leave for further consideration in order for a court of appeal to process the case fully.

An appeal against a judgment by a court of appeal can be made to the Supreme Court (korkein oikeus). You will need permission to appeal to the Supreme Court. This will only be granted under the conditions laid down by law.

What are my rights after sentencing?

With some serious crimes, you can ask to be informed of the release of the offender from prison or pre-trial detention (see below).

Am I entitled to support or protection after the trial? For how long?

Victim support organisations provide support and advice even after the trial

for as long as needed. In cases of domestic violence, a safety plan will be drawn up as part of Multi-Agency Risk Assessment. This is not tied to the ending of the trial.

If you are a victim of human trafficking, your right to special assistance from the Assistance system for victims of human trafficking will cease if the criminal proceedings end without anyone being convicted for human trafficking by a final decision of the court.

What information will I be given if the offender is sentenced?

You have the right to be informed, at your request, of the judgment in a criminal case. The judgment indicates the sentence passed on the accused, including the term of imprisonment.

Parties to criminal proceedings receive a copy of the judgment. You will not be told which prison the offender may be sent to.

Will I be told if the offender is released (including early or conditional release) or escapes from prison?

With some serious crimes, you can ask to be informed if the offender is released from prison or pre-trial detention, escapes, or, under certain conditions, otherwise leaves prison. If you wish to be notified, you must tell this to the pre-trial investigation authority or prosecutor. The investigation authority will provide further information.

You will only be informed if it is believed that this will not pose a risk to the life or health of the prisoner or someone in pre-trial detention.

Will I be involved in release or parole decisions? For example, can I make a statement or lodge an appeal?

No, you have no such right.

Last update: 14/10/2018

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

4 - Compensation

What is the process for claiming damages from the offender? (e.g. court case, civil claim, adhesion procedure)

Claims for compensation for a criminal offence are usually dealt with as part of the hearing of a criminal case in the same trial. You must notify your intention to claim damages to the police during the pre-trial investigation or, at the latest, in court.

You may ask the prosecutor to present your compensation claim for the crime in question in court. It is a good idea to inform the police of this during the pre-trial investigation. The prosecutor may pursue the compensation claim on your behalf if the matter is clear and simple. If the prosecutor does not present the compensation claim, they will notify you in writing.

You can also bring your claim for damages before the court during the criminal proceedings. This can be done by a legal counsel on your behalf.

If necessary, the claim for damages can also be handled in separate civil proceedings. You can also pursue your claim as a separate civil claim. If your claim is not handled together with the criminal case, a court fee will be charged for the proceedings.

The court ordered the offender to pay me damages/compensation. How do I make sure the offender pays?

If the offender fails to pay in accordance with the court decision voluntarily, the judgment can be carried out by way of enforcement. Enforcement will not be initiated automatically. You must file an enforcement request with the enforcement authority and attach the court decision to it.

You cannot claim compensation from the offender for any amount that you have received as state compensation from the State Treasury for the same loss or damage.

If the offender does not pay, can the state pay me an advance? Under what conditions?

You do not have to claim compensation from the offender in order to receive compensation out of state funds. However, you must submit a claim for compensation to the offender at the trial.

Am I entitled to compensation from the state?

If you (or a close relative) are the victim of a crime in Finland, you may be paid compensation out of state funds for the personal injury and suffering caused by the crime. You must report the crime to the police in order to claim compensation.

If the criminal case is heard by a court, you should seek to have your right to compensation upheld by means of a judgment. This means that you should present a claim for compensation against the offender during the court proceedings. Compensation for criminal damage is not generally paid out if you have failed to fulfil this obligation.

You must apply for compensation within three years of the date on which a judgment with legal force is issued in a case of compensation. If the case has not been heard in court, compensation must be claimed within ten years of the date on which the crime was committed. There is only flexibility with these deadlines in special circumstances.

Your compensation claim will be processed by the State Treasury. You can either send your claim electronically to Link opens in new windowrikosvahingot@valtiokonttori.fi or print out the form and post it to: State Treasury, P.O. Box 50, 00054 State Treasury.

Am I entitled to compensation if the offender is not convicted?

You may apply for compensation even if the offender has not been identified. You must enclose a copy of the police record from the pre-trial investigation, or other reliable evidence of the events, with your compensation claim.

You are also entitled to compensation if the offender has been identified but is not convicted because the offender is under the age of 15 or lacks criminal responsibility.

Am I entitled to an emergency payment while I wait for the decision on my compensation claim?

You may submit a written application for an advance compensation payment if necessary. An advance compensation payment may be made if the processing of your compensation case is delayed for reasons beyond your control and you are entitled to a significant amount of compensation.

Last update: 14/10/2018

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

5 - My rights to support and assistance

I am a victim of crime who do I contact for support and assistance?

Link opens in new windowSupport for all crime victims
- Victim Support Finland (Rikosuhripäivystys), tel.: 116 006

Link opens in new windowShelter services for victims of domestic violence

Link opens in new windowOnline Shelter (Nettiturvakoti)

Link opens in new windowSeri Support Centres for victims of sexual assault (over the age of 16):

- Helsinki, Turku, Tampere, Kuopio, Oulu

Tukinainen Rape Crisis Centre

- tel. 0800 97899

Link opens in new windowTukinainen online(Nettitukinainen)

Link opens in new windowTukinainen Rape Crisis Centre Link opens in new windowhttps://www.nettitukinainen.fi/


Link opens in new windowAssistance system for victims of human trafficking

- Joutseno Reception Centre (Joutsenon vastaanottokeskus), tel. 029 54 63 177


Mediation

- mediation offices:

Link opens in new windowMediation in criminal and civil cases

Link opens in new windowMediation in criminal and civil cases (in English)

Link opens in new windowPolice

- emergencies: call 112 (emergency phone number)


Link opens in new windowLegal aid

Link opens in new windowCompensation payable out of state funds for criminal injuries

- State Treasury, tel. 0295 50 2736

Victim support hotline

Victim Support Finland, tel. 116 006

Nollalinja (24/7), tel. 080 005 005 (helpline for victims of domestic violence and violence against women)

Tukinainen Rape Crisis Centre, tel. 0800 97899 (victims of sexual abuse)

Assistance system for victims of human trafficking (24/7), tel. 029 54 63 177 (victims of human trafficking)

Is victim support free?

The support provided by victim support organisations is free of charge. The services provided by shelters, support centres for victims of sexual assault and the Assistance system for victims of human trafficking are also free of charge for the client.

What types of support can I receive from state services or authorities?

A crime victim may need medical assistance or other social welfare and healthcare services, such as emergency social services, hospital treatment and physical and mental rehabilitation. You may use these services under the same conditions as all other clients.

Shelters provide immediate crisis relief, 24-hour safe housing and psychosocial support, advice and counselling for your acute situation. These services are primarily provided to individuals and families who have experienced domestic violence or a threat of violence. Some of the services are provided by organisations. The Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare is responsible for arranging shelter services.

The Assistance system for victims of human trafficking is a state authority which is responsible for ensuring that the rights guaranteed to victims of human trafficking are respected. Support services include safe housing, health care, social services, a reception allowance or social assistance, legal aid and advice, a support person for criminal proceedings, and interpretation and translation services. In addition to the assistance system, organisations also provide assistance to victims of human trafficking.

You have the right to the assistance of a legal counsel for reporting a crime, being questioned and at the trial. The counsel must be a lawyer, public legal aid attorney or licensed legal counsel.

Low- and middle-income earners may be entitled to state-funded legal aid. In such cases, the counsel's fee will be paid for by the state in part or in full. You can apply for legal aid to a public legal aid office or through an electronic service. You can also ask law firms to apply for legal aid on your behalf.

The court can order legal counsel and a support person for you in a case of domestic violence, sex offences or serious offences against your life, health or liberty. In such cases, the state will pay for the fee regardless of the your income.

You can be assisted by a support person at different stages of the criminal proceedings. You can ask anyone you choose to be your support person. The support person may accompany you to hearings and court sessions, but their presence may be restricted in certain circumstances. Victim Support Finland can provide you with a trained support person free of charge. The general victim support services provided by Victim Support Finland are financed by the Ministry of Justice and are subject to a public service obligation.

What types of support can I receive from non-governmental organisations?

Many organisations provide support, advice and guidance to crime victims. Victim Support Finland provides assistance for all types of crimes and criminal proceedings as well as advice relevant to the rights of victims. Victims of domestic violence can seek protection and support from shelters. Help is also available via helplines and community care services. In some localities, special support is available for victims of sexual offences and immigrant women, as well as peer support for the families of homicide victims.

Support services provided by organisations

Link opens in new windowVictim Support Finland

Support for all crime victims, including witnesses and the victim’s family members. Assistance and advice on the exercise of victims’ rights in criminal proceedings. National helpline, legal helpline, online support service. Support person services on a regional basis.

- helpline 116 006 (free of charge)
- legal helpline 0800 161 177 (free of charge)

Link opens in new windowNollalinja

24/7 helpline for victims of domestic violence and violence against women, tel. 080 005 005 (free of charge)

Link opens in new windowFederation of Mother and Child Homes and Shelters (Ensi- ja turvakotien liitto)

Shelters for persons experiencing domestic violence or a threat of violence and who need support for recovery as well as temporary accommodation. Community care services provide support for resolving the situation caused by domestic violence and overcoming the crisis. Advice by phone, talking to a professional in domestic violence, a guided peer group or assisted living.

Link opens in new windowOnline Shelter

Online service maintained by the Federation of Mother and Child Homes and Shelters; helps all parties involved in violent relationships.

Link opens in new windowTukinainen Rape Crisis Centre

Provides support and guidance for persons who have been sexually assaulted and/or abused, as well as for their families. Online help service.

- crisis helpline: tel. 0800 97899 (free of charge)

- legal helpline: tel. 0800 97895 (free of charge)

Link opens in new windowMONIKA – Multicultural Women’s Association, Finland

Easy-access services, legal advice and shelter housing for immigrant women and children who are suffering from violence. Help is available in several languages; support person services are also provided.

- helpline 0800 05058 (free of charge)

- Mona Shelter, tel. 045 639 6274 (24/7)

Link opens in new windowWomen’s Line (Naisten Linja)

Advice and support to women and girls concerned about violence. Information is available online and by phone.

- tel. 0800 02400 (free of charge)

Link opens in new windowPro-tukipiste

Health and support services for people working in the sex or erotic industry and victims of human trafficking.

Link opens in new windowAssociation for family members of homicide victims HUOMA (Henkirikoksen uhrien läheiset ry)

Peer- support for the family members of homicide victims.

- tel. 050401 2230

Link opens in new windowhttps://www.huoma.fi/

Link opens in new windowMIELI Mental Health Finland (Suomen Mielenterveys ry)

Help for life crises.

- crisis helpline 09 2525 0111 (24 h)

Link opens in new windowSuvanto – For A Safe Old Age (Suvanto ry – Turvallisen vanhuuden puolesta)

Help, peer support and legal advice for elderly people against abuse and violence.

- SUVANTO helpline 0800 06776 (free of charge)

Last update: 14/10/2018

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.