Please note that the original language version of this page Latvian has been amended recently. The language version you are now viewing is currently being prepared by our translators.
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Victims' rights - by country

Latvia

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Latvia

You will be considered a victim of crime if you have suffered damage, e.g. you have been injured or your property has been damaged or stolen, etc., as a result of an incident, which constitutes a crime according to national law. As a victim of crime, the law grants you certain individual rights before, during and after court proceedings (trial).

Criminal proceedings in Latvia start with investigation of the crime, which is done by the police under the supervision of the public prosecutor. When the police collect sufficient evidence they forward the case to the public prosecutor to bring charges against the offender. Based on the collected evidence the public prosecutor brings the case to court for trial.

During the trial the court examines the evidence and decides on the guilt of the offender. If the court finds the offender guilty it convicts him/her and imposes a penalty. If there is not sufficient evidence to prove the guilt of the defendant the court will acquit the defendant and release him/her.

The following factsheets will take you through the different steps of the procedure, describing your rights during the investigation of the crimeduring the trial or after the first trial. Also, read more about the help and support you can get.

Last update: 05/01/2012

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

Please note that the original language version of this page Latvian has been amended recently. The language version you are now viewing is currently being prepared by our translators.

1 - My rights during the investigation of a crime

How and where can I report a crime?

How can I follow up on what the authorities do after I report a crime?

How can I be involved in the investigation of the crime?

What are my rights as a witness?

I am a minor. Do I have additional rights?

What information can I obtain from police or victim support organisations during the investigation of the crime?

Can I receive legal aid?

How can I get protection, if I am in danger?

What services and assistance can I be given during the investigation of the crime?

Are there opportunities to reach settlement/conciliation or to start mediation between the offender and myself?

How will my case continue after the end of the investigation?

Can I appeal if my case is closed without reaching the court?

I am a foreigner. How are my rights and interests protected?

More information

How and where can I report a crime?

If you have suffered from or otherwise learned about a crime you can report it:

You can report a crime in any language. If you do not speak Latvian translation will be provided free of charge.

There is no obligatory form you should follow when reporting a crime. If you report in writing you have to include information about yourself (name and surname), a detailed description of the incident, and your contact details (telephone number and e-mail).

There is no deadline for reporting a crime. However, there is a certain period of time specified in the law (ranging from six months to 15 years depending on the crime), after which you can still submit a report but the offender will not be prosecuted.

How can I follow up on what the authorities do after I report a crime?

Your report will be registered and you will be given a reference number. You can check how your case is proceeding by using this reference number. Inquiries can also be made by date of reporting or by the name of the person who has reported the crime.

You can check the progress of your case by:

  • going to the police station or the public prosecutor’s office;
  • calling by phone;
  • sending a letter.

How can I be involved in the investigation of the crime?

You will receive an official letter informing you whether an investigation will be opened on your case. If the decision is to close the case without opening an investigation you have the right to appeal. The deadline for submitting the appeal is ten days following the receipt of the letter. If the decision to close the case has been made by a police officer your appeal should be submitted to the public prosecutor; if a public prosecutor has made the decision the appeal should be submitted to the superior public prosecutor.

If you wish, you can present additional information at any time during the investigation:

  • orally to the police officer in charge of your case, who will write it down in a record; or
  • in writing by sending a letter.

In the course of the investigation you will probably be interviewed by the police. You can change, clarify or supplement your testimony after the interview by:

  • informing the police that you wish to provide additional information, in which case the police will call you for a second interview; or
  • sending additional information in writing to the public prosecutor or the police officer.

You can authorise any person above 18 years of age to represent you. People with mental disabilities are represented by their trustees, close relatives (parents, brothers, sisters, etc.) or representatives of non-governmental organisations.

You can use the assistance of a lawyer. You can choose a lawyer from the Link opens in new windowonline database of lawyers, which offers a full list of lawyers and their contact details. The lawyer’s services will be free of charge if you qualify for legal aid.

You can ask the police officer or the public prosecutor to formally recognise you as a victim. There is no deadline for making the request. If the police officer rejects your request you can appeal against his/her decision to the public prosecutor supervising your case. If the refusal comes from the public prosecutor you can appeal to the superior public prosecutor.

If your spouse, parent, child or other close relative has died as a result of the crime you can also ask to be considered a victim and participate in the criminal proceedings as such.

As a victim you can receive information about the proceedings by asking questions to the public prosecutor or the police, by checking the contents of the case file and by requesting and receiving copies of documents.

You do not need to prove anything in relation to the crime. The public prosecutor and the police are responsible for this. You can provide information to facilitate the investigation and propose investigative actions. Only if you are victim of a less serious offence (e.g. slight bodily injury), will you have to prove the case in court and you will need to collect and present all the evidence.

You can request reimbursement for the expenses related to your participation in the proceedings. Requests are presented to the police or the public prosecution service depending on the investigative action you have participated in. There is no deadline for claiming reimbursement. You can request reimbursement for:

  • travel expenses: public transport or personal vehicle excluding taxi;
  • accommodation: up to 30 Lats (approximately 42 euro) per night in Riga and up to 20 Lats (approximately 28 euro) per night in another place;
  • compensation for lost remuneration;
  • other related expenses.

What are my rights as a witness?

If you are called for an interview as a witness you will receive information about the criminal proceedings for which you will be interviewed and the identity and position of the official conducting the interview. Before the interview you will be informed about your rights and duties as a witness. The authorities are also obliged to inform you of how they will record the interview.

As a witness you can:

  • make notes and additions to the record or request to write your statement by hand in a language that you understand;
  • refuse to testify yourself or against your close relatives;
  • submit a complaint to the investigating judge if a private secret has been disclosed;
  • have a lawyer.

You are obliged not to disclose any information about the investigation you have learned during your interview.

If you are formally recognised as a victim and are interviewed in the course of the investigation as a witness, you will benefit from all the rights of a victim as well.

If you are not formally recognised as a victim and are participating in the proceedings only as a witness, you will have fewer possibilities to be informed about the investigation. However, if you are in danger you will have the same rights to protection measures as the victim.

You can receive reimbursement for your costs related to your testimony.

I am a minor. Do I have additional rights?

If you are a child under 18 years of age your parents or guardian will represent you during the investigation. Your grandparents or your elder brother or sister (provided they are above 18 years of age) can also represent you if you have lived with them and they have been taking care of you. In some specific cases (e.g. when you do not have such relatives) a representative of a governmental agency or non-governmental organisation will represent you. The public prosecutor will assign a lawyer to represent you if he/she believes that the other persons mentioned above would not adequately protect your interests.

If you have suffered from violent crime you will receive special medical and social rehabilitation assistance. Depending on the case, such assistance can be provided at your home or in a specialised facility.

What information can I obtain from police or victim support organisations during the investigation of the crime?

The police officer or the public prosecutor will inform you about your rights if you have been formally recognised as a victim or if you have been called for an interview as a witness. In practice, the information is provided orally when you appear at the police or the public prosecutor’s office.

Can I receive legal aid?

You can receive legal aid free of charge if you want to have a lawyer but because of your low income, specific status (e.g. person in need) or other exceptional circumstances (e.g. natural disaster) you cannot pay for the services of a lawyer.

Legal aid free of charge is also available to people who are dependent on the State (e.g. elderly or ill people accommodated in social rehabilitation institutions, children without parents living in social care homes, etc.).

How can I get protection, if I am in danger?

If you are afraid of the offender you can ask the public prosecutor or the police officer to issue an order prohibiting him/her from approaching you, getting in physical or visual contact with you and talking to you on the phone or communicating with you by other means.

Additional protection is available if you are a victim or a witness and you are afraid that your testimony may put you in danger. Such protection is also available to the persons close to you who might be in danger because of your participation in the proceedings as well as to other persons involved in the detection and investigation of the crime.

You can be placed under special protection before and/or after the opening of the investigation.

Protection measures may include:

  • personal protection;
  • measures ensuring that your communications are not wiretapped and your correspondence is not opened;
  • relocation to a secret place, including relocation abroad;
  • issuance of personal documents (e.g. passport) with another identity;
  • change of permanent residence or place of work;
  • non-disclosure of your personal data available in publicly accessible information systems;
  • insurance of personal property.

If you wish to be placed under special protection you have to submit a written request to the public prosecutor or the police officer in charge of your case. The public prosecutor or the police officer will examine your request and if he/she decides that you need protection, your request will be forwarded to the Prosecutor General who will specify the measures to be taken. The decision on your request must be taken within 10 days.

If you have been placed under special protection you will be interviewed by a representative of the special police unit called Persons Protection Bureau. Your name will be replaced by a pseudonym in all documents related to the case. The address for communicating with you will be the address of the Persons Protection Bureau. If you have to attend investigative actions together with other people your identity will be kept secret by using special technical means. You will also have the right not to answer questions that may reveal your identity.

What services and assistance can I be given during the investigation of the crime?

You can receive medical assistance free of charge if you have a valid health insurance. Citizens of the 27 EU Member States, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland can benefit from the Link opens in new windowEuropean Health Insurance Card. Some healthcare services, e.g. emergency medical care, are free of charge irrespective of whether you have a health insurance or not.

You can receive psychological assistance but you have to pay for it. If the police officer finds it necessary he/she can ask the Crisis Centre (a social institution for the provision of short-term psychological and other types of assistance to persons in crisis situation) to provide a psychologist to assist you.

If you have suffered from a violent crime or you are a victim of human trafficking you can receive social rehabilitation services free of charge.

Psychological assistance and social rehabilitation services free of charge are also available to people with low income.

Are there opportunities to reach settlement/conciliation or to start mediation between the offender and myself?

During the investigation you can request or be invited to participate in a procedure called “victim – offender mediation”. Its objective is to help you reconcile with the offender and reach an agreement on how to rectify the consequences of the crime. During the procedure you will participate in a series of meetings with the offender in the presence of a person called a “mediator”, who will help you to reach conciliation.

Mediation is a voluntary procedure. You can refuse to participate both before and during the procedure.

The main institution offering mediation services is the Link opens in new windowState Probation Service. You can contact the mediation department of the State Probation Service by phone (+371 67021176) or e-mail (Link opens in new windowizligums@vpd.gov.lv). The services provided by the State Probation Service are free of charge.

Some non-governmental organisations also offer mediation services. One such organisation is the Link opens in new windowVictims Support Centre. The services provided by the Victims Support Centre are not free of charge: only the first meeting is free, thereafter there is a fee of 50 Lats (approximately 70 euro) per hour.

How will my case continue after the end of the investigation?

At the end of the investigation the public prosecutor has to decide how to proceed with the case. If the public prosecutor believes that there is sufficient evidence for prosecuting the offender he/she will bring the case to the court for trial. Otherwise, if the collected evidence is not enough, the public prosecutor will close the case.

Can I appeal if my case is closed without reaching the court?

If the public prosecutor decides to close the case without bringing it to court you will receive a notification. You can appeal against the public prosecutor’s decision before the superior public prosecutor. The deadline for submitting the appeal is 10 days.

I am a foreigner. How are my rights and interests protected?

If you are a foreigner you can benefit from all the rights described above. You also have some additional rights to facilitate your participation in the proceedings.

If you do not speak Latvian you can use any language you understand. The police and the public prosecutor are obliged to provide you with an interpreter free of charge. If a document is issued in the course of the investigation, which concerns you, it will also be translated, free of charge.

You can receive legal aid free of charge if you are citizen of the European Union, you legally reside on the territory of Latvia and you cannot pay for the services of a lawyer.

More information:

  • Law on Police (Likums par Policiju) – in Link opens in new windowEnglish and Link opens in new windowLatvian
  • Criminal Law (Krimināllikums) – in Link opens in new windowEnglish and Link opens in new windowLatvian
  • Criminal Procedure Law (Kriminālprocesa likums) – in Link opens in new windowEnglish and Link opens in new windowLatvian
  • Law on Public Prosecutor’s Office (Prokuratūras likums) – in Link opens in new windowEnglish and Link opens in new windowLatvian
  • Medical Treatment Law (Ārstniecības likums) – in Link opens in new windowEnglish and Link opens in new windowLatvian
  • Procedures for the Organisation and Financing of Health Care (Veselības aprūpes organizēšanas un finansēšanas kārtība) – in Link opens in new windowLatvian
  • Law on Social Services and Social Assistance (Sociālo pakalpojumu un sociālās palīdzības likums) – in Link opens in new windowEnglish and Link opens in new windowLatvian
  • Rules of Criminal Procedure Reimbursement Arrangements and the Extent (Noteikumi par kriminālprocesuālo izdevumu atlīdzināšanas kārtību un apmēru) – in Link opens in new windowLatvian
  • Procedures for Providing the Necessary Assistance to the Child, Who Suffered from Illegal Actions (Kārtība, kādā nepieciešamo palīdzību sniedz bērnam, kurš cietis no prettiesiskām darbībām) – in Link opens in new windowLatvian
  • Law on the Residence of Victims of the Trafficking in Human Beings in the Republic of Latvia (Par cilvēku tirdzniecības upura uzturēšanos Latvijas Republikā) – in Link opens in new windowLatvian
  • Rules on Procedures for Trafficking Victims Receive Social Rehabilitation Services, and the Criteria for the Recognition of Human Trafficking Victims (Noteikumi par kārtību, kādā cilvēku tirdzniecības upuri saņem sociālās rehabilitācijas pakalpojumus, un kritērijiem personas atzīšanai par cilvēku tirdzniecības upuri) – in Link opens in new windowLatvian
  • Special Persons Protection Law (Personu speciālās aizsardzības likums) – in Link opens in new windowEnglish and Link opens in new windowLatvian
  • State Ensured Legal Aid Law (Valsts nodrošinātās juridiskās palīdzības likums) – in Link opens in new windowEnglish and Link opens in new windowLatvian
Last update: 05/01/2012

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

2 - My rights during the trial

How can I be involved in the trial?

What are my rights as a witness?

I am a minor. Do I have additional rights?

Can I receive legal aid?

How can I get protection, if I am in danger?

How can I claim damages from the offender or receive compensation from the state?

Are there opportunities to reach settlement/conciliation or to start mediation between the offender and myself?

I am a foreigner. How are my rights and interests protected?

More information

How can I be involved in the trial?

If you have missed the opportunity to ask to be formally recognised as a victim during the investigation, you can ask the court make this formal recognition during the trial. Your request must be made before the court starts to examine the evidence.

As a victim you have the following rights during the trial:

  • to receive information (by registered mail) about the time and place of the court hearing;
  • to receive information about the other participants in the trial (judge, public prosecutor, experts, etc.) and request their removal (e.g. if you believe they will not be objective and impartial);
  • to be present during the court hearings and express your opinion on the issues discussed, including the penalty to be imposed on the offender;
  • to ask questions of the witnesses and the experts and make comments on the evidence;
  • to check the documents in the case file and make copies;
  • to audiotape or videotape the court hearing with the permission of the judge and the other participants in the trial;
  • to check the court decisions and the transcripts of the hearings.

You can receive information about the trial online through the Link opens in new windowLatvian Judicial Portal. You do not need special registration or authorisation but to receive information you have to insert the number of your case.

As a victim, your presence in the courtroom is not obligatory. If you cannot attend the hearing due to justified reasons (e.g. illness) you can ask the court to postpone it. In certain cases the court may also request your presence if it is important for the outcome of the case.

During the trial you can authorise any person above 18 years of age to represent you. You can also use the assistance of a lawyer. You can choose a lawyer from the Link opens in new windowonline database of lawyers, which offers a full list of lawyers and their contact details. The lawyer’s services will be free of charge if you qualify for legal aid.

You can make a request to the court to reimburse you for the expenses related to your participation in the trial. There is no deadline for claiming reimbursement. You can request reimbursement for:

  • travel expenses: public transport or personal vehicle excluding taxi;
  • accommodation: up to 30 Lats (approximately 42 euro) per night in Riga and up to 20 Lats (approximately 28 euro) per night in another place;
  • compensation for lost remuneration;
  • other related expenses.

What are my rights as a witness?

If you are called for an interview as a witness you will receive information about the criminal proceedings for which you will be interviewed and about your rights and duties as a witness.

As a witness you can:

  • make notes and additions to the record or request to write your statement by hand in a language that you understand;
  • refuse to testify yourself or against your close relatives;
  • have a lawyer.

You are obliged not to disclose any information about the case you have learned during your interview.

If you are formally recognised as a victim and are interviewed in the course of the trial as a witness, you will benefit from all rights of a victim.

I am a minor. Do I have additional rights?

If you are child under 18 years of age you will be represented during the trial by:

  • your parents or guardian;
  • your grandparents or your elder brother or sister (provided they are above 18 years of age) if you have lived with them and they have been taking care of you;
  • a representative of a governmental agency or non-governmental organisation (e.g. when you do not have other relatives);
  • a lawyer assigned by the court if the judge believes that the other persons mentioned above would not adequately protect your interests.

Can I receive legal aid?

You can receive legal aid free of charge if you want to have a lawyer but because of your low income, specific status (e.g. person in need) or other exceptional circumstances (e.g. natural disaster) you cannot pay for the services of a lawyer.

How can I get protection, if I am in danger?

You can get additional protection if you are a victim or a witness and you are afraid that your testimony may put you or a person close to you in danger. If you have been placed under additional protection measures during the investigation these measures will continue to apply during the trial. If you have missed this opportunity you can ask the court to place you under special protection during the trial. The judge will examine your request and will decide what type of protection would be most appropriate for you.

The protection measures during the trial are the same as during the investigation and may include:

  • personal protection;
  • measures ensuring that your communications are not wire-tapped and your correspondence is not opened;
  • relocation to a secret place, including relocation abroad;
  • issuance of personal documents (e.g. passport) with another identity;
  • change of permanent residence or place of work;
  • non-disclosure of your personal data available in publicly accessible information systems;
  • insurance of personal property.

If you have been placed under additional protection your identity will be kept secret and your name will be replaced by a pseudonym in all documents related to the case. You can stay out of the courtroom and participate in the hearing through audio or videoconference.

Usually when a person placed under protection is involved in the case the court hearings are non-public. If necessary, you will be interviewed in a separate room and the interview will be broadcasted in the courtroom in a way that does not reveal your identity. You can refuse to answer questions that may reveal your identity. You can even refuse to be interviewed at all, in which case the judge will read in the courtroom the record of your interview during the investigation. You can participate in the hearing through audio conference or videoconference so that you do not need to be present in the courtroom.

How can I claim damages from the offender or receive compensation from the State?

You can claim financial compensation from the offender if the crime has caused you physical injury, psychological suffering or financial loss. You can submit your claim during the investigation or during the trial before the court starts examining the evidence. The claim should include a justification of the requested amount. You can submit your claim orally or in writing.

You can withdraw your claim at any time before the court starts discussing the final judgment. The withdrawal of your claim will not affect the rest of the proceedings.

If you are not satisfied with the amount of the compensation awarded by the court you can submit another claim before a civil court. When deciding on your claim the civil court will take into account the amount awarded to you during the criminal proceedings.

If you have suffered from a violent crime you can apply for financial compensation from the State. Please consult the factsheet on compensation to victims of crime in Latvia (available in Link opens in new windowEnglish, Link opens in new windowLatvian and other languages) of the European Judicial Network.

Are there opportunities to reach settlement/conciliation or to start mediation between the offender and myself?

You can reconcile with the offender at any time before the court starts discussing the final judgement. You have to notify the judge about the conciliation you have reached. The notification can be oral or in writing. The court will take into account your conciliation and, depending on how serious the crime was, may close the case without convicting and sentencing the offender or impose a lighter penalty.

During the trial there are limited opportunities to start a mediation procedure. The Link opens in new windowState Probation Service has temporarily (until 31 December 2012) stopped providing mediation services at this stage of the proceedings but mediation can still be carried out with the involvement of NGOs.

I am a foreigner. How are my rights and interests protected?

If you are a foreigner you can benefit from all the rights described above. You also have some additional rights to facilitate your participation in the trial.

If you do not speak Latvian you can use any language you understand. The court will provide you with an interpreter free of charge.

If a document is issued in the course of the investigation, which directly concerns you, it will also be translated, free of charge. In practice, documents are usually translated orally.

You can receive legal aid free of charge if you are citizen of the European Union, you legally reside on the territory of Latvia and you cannot pay for the services of a lawyer.

More information:

  • Criminal Procedure Law (Kriminālprocesa likums) – in Link opens in new windowEnglish and Link opens in new windowLatvian
  • Rules of Criminal Procedure Reimbursement Arrangements and the Extent (Noteikumi par kriminālprocesuālo izdevumu atlīdzināšanas kārtību un apmēru) – in Link opens in new windowLatvian
  • Special Persons Protection Law (Personu speciālās aizsardzības likums) – in Link opens in new windowEnglish and Link opens in new windowLatvian
  • State Ensured Legal Aid Law (Valsts nodrošinātās juridiskās palīdzības likums) – in Link opens in new windowEnglish and Link opens in new windowLatvian
  • Law on State Compensation to Victims (Likums par valsts kompensāciju cietušajiem) – Link opens in new windowEnglish and Link opens in new windowLatvian
Last update: 05/01/2012

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

Please note that the original language version of this page Latvian has been amended recently. The language version you are now viewing is currently being prepared by our translators.

3 - My rights after the (first) trial

Can I appeal against a sentence or if the defendant is declared not guilty?

Is further appeal possible?

What rights do I have after the court sentence enters into force?

More information

Can I appeal against a sentence or if the defendant is declared not guilty?

The trial will conclude with a final court decision on the case. If there is sufficient evidence that the offender has committed the crime the court will convict him/her and impose a penalty. Otherwise the defendant will be acquitted and released. You will be informed of the court’s decision and you will receive a copy of it.

As a victim, if you are not satisfied with the court’s decision you can appeal against it. You have to submit your appeal in writing. The deadline for the submission of the appeal is 10 days following the date on which you have received the copy of the decision or 20 days if the court has extended the deadline. You should formally address your appeal to the court superior to the one that issued the decision but submit it to the court whose decision you are appealing against. A full list of courts is available online at the Link opens in new windowLatvian Judicial Portal.

You will be informed about the time and place of the court hearing. You can attend the hearing and you can benefit from the same rights that are available to you during the trial.

Is further appeal possible?

If you are not satisfied with the decision on your appeal and you believe the court has not observed the relevant legal provisions you have the opportunity to appeal before the Link opens in new windowSenate of the Supreme Court. The deadline for appeal is ten days after you have been informed about the decision. You can ask the court to extend the deadline up to 20 days.

The Senate of the Supreme Court may decide to examine the case in a so-called “written procedure” without holding a hearing. In this case you can present your arguments only in writing.

You can also object to the written procedure and request the holding of a hearing. If the court agrees to hold a public hearing you will receive information about its time and place. You can attend the hearing and present your arguments orally to the court.

What rights do I have after the court sentence enters into force?

The court’s decision will enter into force after all opportunities for appeal are exhausted. You can request and receive a copy of the final court’s decision. If the offender has been ordered to pay you compensation for damages the court will provide you with a document called “writ of execution”, which you can use if the defendant refuses to pay compensation.

The law does not provide you with the opportunity to receive information about the release of the offender or to make a statement when early release is being discussed but you can continue to benefit from protection measures if you are still in danger.

More information:

  • Criminal Procedure Law (Kriminālprocesa likums) – in Link opens in new windowEnglish and Link opens in new windowLatvian
Last update: 05/01/2012

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

4 - Help and support for victims of crime

Legal Aid Administration

State Police

State Probation Service

Riga Municipal Police

Victims Support Centre

Centre Dardedze

Society Skalbes

Resource Centre for Women Marta

Legal Aid Administration

The Legal Aid Administration is the institution responsible for the provision of legal aid and compensation to victims of crime.

The Legal Aid Administration

  • is an administrative institution subordinated to the Ministry of Justice
  • is the institution responsible for the provision of legal aid and compensation to victims of crime who have obtained the status of low-income or needy persons
  • services are provided free of charge

CONTACTS:

Website: Link opens in new windowhttp://www.jpa.gov.lv/

State Police

The State Police receive reports for crimes from victims and perform the investigation on criminal cases.

The State Police

  • receive reports from victims about committed crimes
  • perform investigation of criminal cases
  • protect victims in danger

CONTACTS:

Website: Link opens in new windowhttp://www.vp.gov.lv/

State Probation Service

The State Probation Service provides the opportunity for a victim and a probation client to engage voluntarily in the process of settlement through an intermediary (victim offender mediation).

The State Probation Service

  • applies social behaviour correction measures
  • ensures the possibility for a victim and a probation client to engage voluntarily in the process of settlement through an intermediary (victim offender mediation)

CONTACTS:

Website: Link opens in new windowhttp://www.probacija.lv/

Riga Municipal Police

The Riga Municipal Police is responsible for the public safety in Riga.

Riga Municipal Police

  • is responsible for the protection of public safety in the city of Riga
  • cooperates with the State Police in the investigation of crimes committed on the territory of Riga

CONTACTS:

Website: Link opens in new windowhttp://rpp.riga.lv/

Victims Support Centre

The Victims Support Centre is a non-governmental organisation offering legal aid and free psychological consultations to victims as well as victim-offender mediation.

The Victims Support Centre

  • renders help for victims of crime
  • works on crime prevention and protection of victims’ rights
  • informs about victims’ rights and support in criminal procedure
  • renders assistance to victims’ immediate needs to diminish and prevent consequences of crime
  • facilitates victims and other risk groups’ integration in society
  • facilitates perpetrators’ action in remuneration of caused damages
  • balances the interests of victims and perpetrators (in mediation process)
  • offers legal aid, free consultations, victim-offender mediation, educational and informational services

CONTACTS:

Website: Link opens in new windowhttp://www.cac.lv/

Centre Dardedze

Centre Dardedze is a non-governmental organisation offering counselling and assistance for children – victims of violence.

The Centre Dardedze

  • is a non-governmental, non-profit organisation working to prevent child abuse and to provide direct help to children exposed to sexual, physical, emotional abuse and neglect
  • works with children and adult clients in providing assistance and in preventing child abuse from happening
  • offers counselling and assistance for children – victims of violence
  • has a team of professional staff consisting of social workers, psychologists, art therapists, vocational therapist and educators

CONTACTS:

Website: Link opens in new windowhttp://www.centrsdardedze.lv/

Society Skalbes

Society Skalbes maintains a crisis telephone line 7 222 922, available 24 hours, seven days a week, offering psychological consultations and information about aid available in Latvia.

The Society Skalbes

  • maintains a crisis telephone line 7 222 922, available 24 hours, seven days a week, offering psychological consultations and information about aid available in Latvia
  • holds seminars for other organisations on topics such as domestic violence, child abuse, stress and self-help, crisis intervention basic principles, accidents and sudden traumatic events, communication and interrelationship skills
  • has support groups for women who suffer from sexual abuse and domestic violence, children and youth support groups, self-support groups for men

CONTACTS:

Website: Link opens in new windowhttp://www.skalbes.lv/

Resource Centre for Women Marta

Resource Centre for Women Marta secures support services for women victims of violence and human trafficking.

The Resource Centre for Women Marta

  • promotes mutual support, understanding, and solidarity between women, regardless of age, ethnicity, or socioeconomic status
  • educates clients about their rights, provides them with information, and helps women develop their knowledge base and competency so that women gain confidence in their own abilities to successfully realise their goals
  • facilitates the social integration of low-income women
  • secures support services for victims of human trafficking
  • develops broad cooperation between women’s organisations and facilitates a network of cooperation between women’s organisations in Latvia

CONTACTS:

Website: Link opens in new windowhttp://www.marta.lv/

Last update: 05/01/2012

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