Land registers in EU countries

Land registries in the Member States offer a wide range of services, which may vary from one country to another.

However, the core services provided by all registries are to register, examine and store land and property information, such as location and ownership, and to make this information available to the public and professional customers.

Please select the relevant country's flag to obtain detailed national information.

Last update: 18/01/2019

This page is maintained by the European Commission. The information on this page does not necessarily reflect the official position of the European Commission. The Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice with regard to copyright rules for European pages.

The language version you are now viewing is currently being prepared by our translators.
Please note that the following languages have already been translated.

Land registers in Member States - Belgium

This section provides you with an overview of the Belgian land register.

What does the Belgian land register offer?

Information about immovable property in Belgium can be found in the documentation held by offices of three kinds: the land register properly so called (kadaster/cadastre), the registration offices (registratiekantoren/bureaux de l’enregistrement) and the mortgage depositories (hypotheekbewaringen/conservations d’hypothèques). These three sources of information have been grouped together in the Federal Ministry of Finance’s national property documentation centre (Algemene Administratie van de Patrimoniumdocumentatie/Administration Générale de la Documentation Patrimoniale).

The tasks of the land register proper and of the registration offices are mainly, but not exclusively, tax-related. The mortgage depositories are responsible for registering property rights in rem: the creation and transfer inter vivos of rights in rem in immovable property must be recorded in the mortgage depository in order to be enforceable against third parties acting in good faith.

Is access to the Belgian land register free of charge?

No, there is a fee for obtaining information from the documentation in the land register, the registration offices and the mortgage depositories. The amount varies according to the type of documentation consulted and the information requested.

How to search the Belgian land register

In general, information about immovable property and/or the holders of the rights in rem in immovable property can be found either by identifying the property (address and/or land register identification number) or by identifying the holder of the rights in rem (name and/or identity number).

The national property documentation centre has concluded agreements with certain professional groups (such as notaries, surveyors and estate agents) on the online consultation of certain data in the documentation of the land register.

History of the Belgian land register

The documentation held by the land register, the registration offices and the mortgage depositories has been kept since before the foundation of the Belgian state.

History does not stand still: a plan to integrate the three data sources into a single one is currently nearing completion and should be implemented in the near future.

Last update: 14/11/2012

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

The language version you are now viewing is currently being prepared by our translators.
Please note that the following languages have already been translated.

Land registers in Member States - Bulgaria

This section provides you with an overview of Bulgaria's property registry.

What does the Bulgarian property register offer?

The Link opens in new windowBulgarian property register is owned and managed by the Link opens in new windowRegistry Agency, within the framework of what is called the ‘personal entry system’. Information is based on the personal files of the transacting parties, namely individuals and legal persons. Only transactions and legal documents are entered in the register.

Since the development and roll-out of the Integrated Information System for Cadastre and Property Registration (IKAR), all entries are publicly available on the website of the Link opens in new windowLand Registry Agency.

The IKAR system consists of two modules:

  1. An administrating module, which is available only for service use
  2. A customer module, which is available only for customer use

The IKAR system offers both semantic and graphic information, especially in cases where digitised cadastral maps are available.

The website of the Link opens in new windowBulgarian property register provides:

  • Information about transactions entered
  • Access to real estate data and property rights data
  • The sequenced order of these rights

It also offers the following types of public service:

  • Verifications (references)
  • Certificates
  • Duplicates of legislation

The above-mentioned services give you information about:

  • Date of the entry
  • Disclosure of the act
  • The parties concerned
  • Real estate property descriptions

How documents are entered on the register?

Copies of legal transactions and documents are presented to the registry office.

Every document is registered in the entry registry of the IKAR system, where it receives a number showing the exact date and time of the entry.

Documents are then presented to the entry judges for verification and resolution.

After approval by an entry judge, registry officials manually enter information on the system.

All documents are then scanned and saved on the system.

The procedure for registering, verifying and entering the information takes an average of one working day.

Is access to the Bulgarian property registry free of charge?

Access to the Bulgarian property register is free and open to all. However, only registered users can obtain information from the website.

A fee is payable for online verification, in line with legal criteria.

Searching the Bulgarian property register

You can search the property register by: personal identification number (PIN) of legal or natural persons; by name of owner; by detailed description of the property; by property lot number; by registration number.

History of the Bulgarian property registry

The first electronic system was created in 1990. Since then, several electronic systems have been introduced.

The main reform of the property registry took place when it was transferred to the jurisdiction of the Registry Agency, which was created in July 2004. The Registry Agency managed and improved the existing information data systems until the creation of the IKAR system on the 8th September 2008.

The implementation of IKAR took place in phases. The old data was migrated into the new IKAR system. The system became fully functional (covering the entire territory of Bulgaria) on the 26th January 2009, and is fully integrated with the Geodesy Cartography and Cadastre Agency’s registry.

The principles of publicity, transparency and security of procedures are guaranteed.

Last update: 25/08/2017

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

Land registers in Member States - Czech Republic

This section provides you with an overview of the Czech Republic's cadastre (property) register.

What does the Czech cadastre register offer?

Link opens in new windowThe Czech cadastre register contains both factual and legal information on property. On the register you can find cadastral maps and information on property owners.

Is access to the Czech cadastre register free of charge?

Browsing and searching the maps and basic information on property on the internet, including the names and addresses of owners, is free of charge.

Fees are payable for an official listing, either on paper or electronically by remote access, containing all information on legal relationships concerning property; fees may vary depending on the scope of the listing, but are normally CZK 100.

Searching the Czech cadastre register

The Czech cadastre register provides you with an advanced search engine for online searches

History of the Czech cadastre register

The electronic information system has been in use since 2001.

Last update: 09/07/2019

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

Land registers in Member States - Denmark

This section provides you with an overview of Denmark's land register.

What does the Danish Land register offer?

The Link opens in new windowDanish Land Register is available online (only available in Danish). Please consult the register's website for details regarding access, payment and searching.

The Danish Land register can be contacted via email at: Link opens in new windowtinglysning@domstol.dk

Is access to the Danish Land register free of charge?

Please see the Register's website.

How to search the Danish Land register

Please see the Register's website.

History of the Danish Land register

Please see the Register's website.

Last update: 10/09/2013

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

Please note that the original language version of this page German has been amended recently. The language version you are now viewing is currently being prepared by our translators.

Land registers in Member States - Germany

This section provides you with an overview of Germany's land register.

What does the German land register offer?

The German land register provides information on civil law legal relationships concerning real estate, such as ownership data and third party rights in rem (rights over the thing itself rather than rights against a specific person). The land register is maintained primarily in electronic format.

The land register may be accessed only by persons who can show a legitimate interest in consulting it (e.g. particularly for legal or economic reasons). To do so, they must first contact the land registry office in the district in which the property is located. Those persons may also apply for excerpts from the land register.

Furthermore, a restricted group of users may consult the land register data via an electronic portal for the particular federal state. These users include German courts, public authorities, notaries, credit institutions and utility companies. The judicial authorities of the federal states are responsible for regulating these access rights.

Is access to the German land register free of charge?

Consulting the German land register at the land registry office is free of charge. A simple excerpt from the register costs EUR 10, a certified copy EUR 20. There is also a charge for accessing or consulting the land register electronically.

How to search the German land register

In the German land register you can search by the following search criteria:

  • Land register folio number
  • Cadastral unit
  • Address
  • Name of the owner

History of the German land register

Using the land register, you can usually trace the ownership history of real estate back to the start of the 20th century.

From the mid-1990s onwards, the paper version of the German land register has been gradually replaced by an electronic version. This migration is now largely complete.

Last update: 08/12/2015

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

The language version you are now viewing is currently being prepared by our translators.
Please note that the following languages have already been translated.

Land registers in Member States - Estonia

This section provides a brief overview of Estonia’s land register.

What information does the Estonian land register give?

The Link opens in new windowEstonian Land Register is a record of proprietary interests and restricted rights, providing third parties with information about registered immovable property.

The land register focuses on both legal and factual circumstances. All property is entered into the land register, unless otherwise provided for by law. Each individual property has an independent entry and is given a unique number (registered property number).

The register has four parts.

Part 1 contains the following information on each registered property:

  • land-register reference;
  • specific purpose;
  • location;
  • restricted rights established for the registered property;
  • area (size);
  • mergers and divisions;
  • amalgamation with another registered property, or severance of part of the property.

Part 2 contains the following information on each registered property:

  • the owner;
  • if the property is in joint ownership, details of such; whether the property is in joint ownership or common ownership; the owners’ names;
  • notional size of the co-owners’ shares (common ownership);

Part 3 contains the following information on each registered property:

  • restricted rights encumbering the property (except mortgages);
  • restrictions on ownership;
  • notes concerning such restrictions;
  • restrictions on the owner’s right of disposal;
  • other notes concerning ownership (including restrictions on the disposal rights of the persons concerned), and any amendments to or deletions of the abovementioned entries.

Part 4 contains the following information on each registered property:

  • the mortgage holder;
  • monetary value of the mortgage (outstanding sum);
  • notes concerning the mortgage;
  • amendments to entries;
  • deletion of entries.

The various parts of the land register are publicly available and can be accessed by anyone. Where there is a legitimate interest, the file for a given registered property can be consulted. Property owners, notaries, bailiffs, the courts and supervisory authorities do not need to prove the existence of a legitimate interest.

Is access to the Estonian land register free of charge?

The land register is kept electronically.

The various parts of the land register and files for registered properties can be consulted at the Link opens in new windowpremises of the Land Registry Department, at a Link opens in new windownotary's office or via the Link opens in new windowsearch engine. It is free to consult the land register at the Land Registry Department. Owners can also consult those parts of the register concerning them and their property files, free of charge, via the State portal. There is a charge for consulting the land register at a notary's office or via the search engine.

The information contained in the land register can be accessed via the online search engine provided by the Centre of Registers and Information Systems. Use of the search engine is free of charge. The search result displays all the information entered in Part 1 of the land register (land-register reference, specific purpose, area and address). A fee is charged for access to more specific information in the land register.

The charge is €1 for each search of a search item.

A search item is any of the following information in a land register part opened for any registered property:
digital data in Part 1 (Composition of the property);
digital data in Part 2 (Owner);
digital data in Parts 3 (Encumbrances and restrictions) and 4 (Mortgages).

The search fee includes access to opened property files and issuing the documentation they contain.

Detailed information for register parts can be consulted in line with the services fees listed Link opens in new windowhere. These fees are not subject to VAT.

How to search the Estonian land register

You can search the database using the following search criteria:

  • address;
  • land-register reference;
  • name of owner;
  • personal identification number/registry code;
  • name of property;
  • property number;
  • land-registry district.

It is also possible to search for information on non-valid owners and authorised persons.

History of the Estonian land register

The electronic version of the land register contains information dating back to 1994. The change-over to the electronic version began in the summer of 2010.

Last update: 14/05/2019

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

Land registers in Member States - Ireland

This section offers you an overview of Ireland's land register.

What does the Irish land register offer?

The Link opens in new windowIrish Land Register is operated and maintained by the Link opens in new windowProperty Registration Authority of Ireland, the statutory body responsible for land registration in Ireland.

You can find both legal and factual details in the Irish land register.

Each title record is divided into three parts.

  1. Part 1 describes the geographical location of the property, by reference to a digital map and type of tenure (freehold or leasehold).
  2. Part 2 contains the names and addresses of the registered owners and the nature of the legal title.
  3. Part 3 sets out the legal encumbrances (mortgages, rights of way, etc.) affecting the property.

Is access to the Irish land register free of charge?

The Irish land register is an ‘open’ register. There is thus no restriction on using the service and the Property Registration Authority (PRA) charges no subscription fee for access.

However, fees are charged for actual usage of the service – at rates set out in the prevailing statutory fees order. Fees may be paid electronically or manually.

The Irish Land Register subscription service requires:

  • A pre-paid account kept in credit
  • An assigned user ID and password
  • Configuration of the appropriate security access.

At present, you can take out a subscription to the Link opens in new windowIrish Land Register service directly from the Property Registration Authority.

There are currently over 15,000 subscribed users of the Link opens in new windowIrish Land Registry, and over 3 million transactions are conducted through the online service annually.

Since 2011, access to the Land Registry map and folio databases is also provided on a non-subscription basis and payment of fees by credit card is supported.

How to search the Irish land register

The Irish land register may be searched by a variety of means, including:

  • Official title number
  • Postal address of the property
  • By navigating the online map
  • By selecting a map area
  • By inputting map coordinates

History of the Irish land register

The current system of land registration in operation in Ireland was established in 1892. Based on an ‘open’ register underpinned by a state-guarantee, the system was designed to replace gradually a registration of deeds system that had been in operation since 1707.

Related Links

Link opens in new windowEuropean Land Information Service, Link opens in new windowPortal for Irish Government websites, Link opens in new windowProperty Registration Authority of Ireland, Link opens in new windowOnline services from Irish land register

Last update: 12/11/2018

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

Land registers in Member States - Greece

Greece has an electronic land register known as the Cadastre (κτηματολόγιο)in areas where land registration has been completed. Local mortgage registries (υποθηκοφυλακεία) are also operating provisionally as land registries (κτηματολογικά γραφεία).

Under Law 2664/1998 on the Hellenic Cadastre, land register data may be stored and updated only electronically in areas where the Cadastre has been operating since 2003, replacing the previous system of property transfers and mortgages. The land register database is stored centrally for the whole country by the company Ktimatologio (Κτηματολόγιο Α.Ε.) and is updated by the local land registries based on their transactions.

What does the Greek property data and document storage system offer?

One or more registries operate within the jurisdiction of each district civil court (ειρηνοδικείο) and offer the following services by law:

  1. registration, attachment and seizure of property within their jurisdiction;
  2. transfer of acts that must be transferred by law; and
  3. registration of lawsuits and any other acts or notes relating to property.

There are 17 stipendiary and 378 gratis mortgage registries.

Stipendiary mortgage registries (έμμισθα υποθηκοφυλακεία) operate under the Ministry of Justice, Transparency and Human Rights. On the islands of Rhodes and Kos, the Rhodes and Kos-Leros land registries, where the property transfer system is based on land, provide services for the Ministry of Justice.

Gratis mortgage registries (άμισθα υποθηκοφυλακεία) are either:

  1. specialised (ειδικά), run by a registrar (υποθηκοφύλακας) appointed by the Minister for Justice after passing a competitive examination; or
  2. non-specialised (μη ειδικά), run by a notary appointed to the registry.

Contact details for the above mortgage registries may be found on the website of the Link opens in new windowGreek Ministry of Justice, Transparency and Human Rights.

Furthermore, there is an institutional framework in Greece for the study, development and operation of the Hellenic Cadastre (Εθνικό Κτηματολόγιο) for property. This task has been assigned to the private company Ktimatologio.

The Hellenic Cadastre is a unified system, guaranteed by the State, for recording legal, technical and other information on property and associated rights.

In particular, the Hellenic Cadastre:

  • records all acts creating, transferring, altering or removing rights on property. Each act is recorded only after being thoroughly checked, so that no act is recorded if a person transferring a property is not the person listed in the land register as owner of the property;
  • records a geographical description (form, location and size) of the property;
  • systematically records public property; and
  • records rights of usufruct.

Land registration is already complete in 333 areas of the country. 96 local mortgage registries (stipendiary and gratis) are provisionally operating as land registries.

Legal database

Basic information about the Link opens in new windowHellenic Cadastre may be found on its website.

Is access to Greek property data storage services free of charge?

In areas where land registries are operating provisionally, computers available free of charge at the relevant offices may be used to search for data electronically.

Under the NSRF, the company Ktimatologio has been commissioned to develop a project for digital document transmission for mortgage registries, with a view to completion of land registration in the rest of the country. The project includes creating infrastructure for: (a) online submission of acts for entry in land register records; and (b) online submission and processing of requests for certificates from those records.

Relevant provisions are included in draft legislation prepared by the Ministry of the Environment, Energy and Climate Change.

History of the Greek property data and document storage system

A system of land registration was first provided for in Law 41/1836. The authorities referred to above have kept land records ever since land registration began.

In areas where land registration is being completed, local mortgage registries have been operating as provisional land registries ever since the Mapping and Cadastral Organisation of Greece (Οργανισμός Κτηματολογίου και Χαρτογραφήσεων ΕλλάδοςΟΚΧΕ) decided to create the Cadastre. Since that time, transactions in land register records have been recorded solely by electronic means.

How to search for data

The electronic land registration system allows searches by: (a) personal data; (b) Hellenic Cadastre code; and/or (c) property address.

Related links

Link opens in new windowHellenic Cadastre

Last update: 25/06/2018

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

The language version you are now viewing is currently being prepared by our translators.
Please note that the following languages have already been translated.

Land registers in Member States - Spain

The Registro de la Propiedad (Land Register) is a register which comes under the Ministry of Justice, with its affairs coming under the responsibility of the Dirección General de los Registros y del Notariado (directorate general of registers and notaries). The Register is used to record and publish ownership of property and rights attached to property and any court or administrative decisions which may affect them.

What does the Land Register in Spain offer?

Legal and economic security. And in the majority of cases this security is irrefutible.

Some of the most typical aspects of the Spanish Land Register system are described below.

1. Purpose of the Land Register

The purpose of the Land Register is to register ownership and other rights in rem in respect of immovable property.

1.1. Rights in rem which can be registered

The rights in rem which can be registered are: ownership, usufruct, rights of use and abode, encumbrances, leases, mortgages, right of redemption, and other rights in rem.

The Spanish Land Register is not a closed list of rights in rem., but a "numerus opertus" system in which rem rights can be created. Nevertheless, in practice it is difficult to create new types of rights since they would have to meet the structural requirements of rights in rem such as immediacy and absoluteness.

1.2. Other rights which can be registered

It is possible to enter other rights on the Land Register, although their true nature is not always clear. The following can be registered in this way: co-ownership statutes, leases, sub‑leases, transfers and subrogations of leases concerning immovable property, recovery of rented property, administrative concessions and mortgages on them, acts related to compulsory purchase or administrative proceedings, bans on access allowed by law, or reasons for the termination of registered rights, among others.

And in the area of town planning: final planning implementing measures affecting existing buildings, sales to municipal authorities, transfer of urban land use rights, conditions for planning permission, proceedings instituted in the area of town planning, and appeals lodged and the court's decisions, among others.

1.3. Other measures

Court decisions affecting the capacity of natural or legal persons and those arising from an arrangement with creditors can also be registered whenever they concern the ownership of real estate or rights in rem thereof.

In addition, through provisional registration the Register can record provisional situations that affect rights in rem related to real estate. For example, proceedings concerning rights that can be registered, confiscation, non-final decisions, court orders banning access to property, inheritance law and similar measures.

2. Legal Certainty in the Spanish Land Register

The Spanish Register system is definitely one of the safest in the world.

It is a Register of rights. The rights entered in the Register are protected by the courts, which means that no-one can be deprived of these rights unless legal proceedings involving the registered owner decide the contrary.

In addition, the legal system ascribes a series of legal presumptions to the registered rights that are based on the principle of the authority of the Register.

In cases of conflict between the actual situation and that contained in the Register, the declarations in the Register are regarded as reliable because of the principle of publication.

The principle of publication has two core elements:

The procedural element whereby registered owners can defend their registered rights in the courts before which the matter is being challenged by means of a certificate from the Registrar attesting the validity of the relevant matter without contradiction. The burden of proof therefore falls on the person challenging the registered right.

The substantive element to which there are two distinct dimensions:

  1. Negative- anything not registered does not affect those who enter into a contract, relying on the contents of the Register.
  2. Positive – there is a double presumption in the content of the register:
  • Principle of Legitimacy – the presumption in the absence of evidence to the contrary that the information published in the Register is truthful.
  • Principal of the authority of the Register – the presumption juris et de jure that the information published in the Register is accurate and complete, i.e. if the following requirements are met:
    1. Registration of the owner who is transferring the property.
    2. Acquisition for valuable consideration.
    3. The purchaser is unaware of a circumstance that invalidates what is published in the Register (good faith is presumed in principle).
    4. Entry by the purchaser; produces the legal effect that the new owner is fully protected by the Spanish registration system, even if the registered owner who transferred the right to him is not the real owner of the right.

3.- Registration Procedure

The general principle is that public certification is required to make entries in the Land Register. Documents may be validated by notaries, the courts or administrative authorities. Private documents are admitted in exceptional cases, e.g. application to register the inheritance of a sole heir, to correct certain defects, or to provisionally register loans to construct or repair fixed assets.

The procedure must be requested. This means, other than in exceptional circumstances, it is initiated by the person who wishes to make the entry.

The document must be submitted to the Register and a presentation entry made in the journal, which is valid for sixty working days.

The document can be presented in one of five ways: electronically, in person, by post, by fax or through another Land Register. In the last two cases, the document must be presented in person within 10 working days.

The Registrar classifies the document, under his responsibility, within fifteen working days.

If he decides to register it, the entry is made. The document is then returned to the person submitting it, with a footnote, signed by the Registrar, stating that it has been processed.

If the Registrar notes any defect in the document he will decide not to register it. The Registrar’s decision should indicate, in the Facts and Legal Principles, the reasons for not registering the document. The decision must be notified to the person submitting the document and the notary who authorised the deed, or the courts or administrative authority which issued the document. The presentation entry is automatically extended by the Registrar for sixty days from the last date of the above-mentioned notifications.

If the Registrar decides not to register a document, the person concerned can either correct the defect, if possible, or appeal against the Registrar’s decision. Three different kinds of appeal are possible:

  • Request a classification by another Registrar.
  • Lodge an appeal against the registrar’s decision with the Directorate-General of Registers and Notary Services. A decision on the appeal should be handed down within three months, otherwise the appeal will be deemed to have been dismissed. An appeal can be lodged with the courts against the decision or presumed decision.
  • Lodge a request for an oral procedure before the Court of First Instance of the capital of the province in which the Land Register is located.

Is access to the Business Register free of charge?

Access to the Business Register in Spain is not free of charge. This is laid down in the following legislative acts: third additional provision of Law 8/1989 on Fees; Article 294 of the Mortgage Law and Articles 589-619 of the Mortgage Regulation.

The Fees of Land Registrars were approved by Royal Decree 1427/1989. These fees are public, i.e. they are contained in an official legislative act published in the Official State Gazette. A complete copy of the fees is also available to the public in all Land Registers. Link opens in new windowFees of Land Registrars.

How do I consult the Land Register in Spain?

1.- Legitimate interest

The Land Registers are public for those with a legitimate interest in investigating the state of recorded property or rights in rem.

Any authority, employee or public servant acting by reason of his office is presumed to have a legitimate interest.

2.- Abbreviated extract from the register

An abbreviated extract from the register ('nota simple') is of a purely informative nature and is not an authentic representation of the content of the entry, without prejudice to the Registrar’s responsibility.

How to obtain an abbreviated extract. There are two methods:

  • In writing. By requesting it in person from the relevant Land Register. Cost: €3.01 plus VAT for each property.
  • By Internet. Via the first link at the bottom of this page. Cost: €9.02 plus VAT for each property.

3.- Certification

A certificate is a copy, transcription or transfer, either in full or in summary form, of the contents of the information held in the Register which, once it is processed by the Registrar, conveys the authentic nature of the mortgage situation of the properties and rights.

How to obtain a certificate?

Certificates can only be obtained by written request. You can make this request in person at the relevant Land Register. Cost: €30.01 plus VAT for each property.

However, the possibility is currently being introduced in some (but not all) Land Registers of applying for a certificate electronically, using an electronic signature recognised by the Registrar.

4.- Consulting the Land Register via the Internet

The procedure is very simple - just follow the instructions on the web page below:

Link: Link opens in new windowhttps://www.registradores.org/registroVirtual/init.do

  • The website offers you the possibility of paying by credit card if you are not a subscriber or do not have a recognised certificate from the Association of Registrars:- “card payments”. You must enter your credit card details and then click on ‘Enter’.
  • On this page you can choose between: the Land Register, the Business Register, the Movable Property Register or the Register of General Contract Conditions. You should select ‘Public land records’.
  • Then select your area of interest.

History of the Land Register in Spain

1.- Antecedents

Historical antecedents of current mortgage legislation in Spain are:

  • Decree of Juana I and Charles I of 1539, which introduced, though without much success, census and mortgage charges.
  • Decree of Charles III of 1768. Liberal decree which created the mortgage listings. These were widely used but had two main drawbacks: they were merely a register of charges, not of ownership, and they were kept in chronological order.

2.- Current mortgage legislation

Economic changes in the 19th century made it urgently necessary to create a system that could provide certainty with regard to ownership and transfers of immovable property, promote regional reliability and prevent usury and lawsuits.

1861 Mortgage Law. This Law was passed as a special urgent legislative measure as a result of the failure of unitary codes. It was intended to be integrated in the future Civil Code. However, the 1888 Civil Code respected the substantive aspect of property law, much of which is still contained in the Mortgage Law.

Comprehensive reforms.- There were comprehensive reforms of the Mortgage Law in 1869, 1909 and 1944-46, in addition to several partial reforms.

Implementing provisions

  • Mortgage Regulation. Decree of 14 February 1947, much of which has been amended.
  • Royal Decree 1093/1997 of 4 July 1997 on registration of land-use planning documents.

3.- Organisation

In Spain the Land Registers come under the Ministry of Justice. All matters relating to them are referred to the Directorate-General of Registers and Notary Services.

Spain is divided into areas called mortgage districts (Distritos Hipotecarios). Each Mortgage District has a corresponding Land Register kept by a Land Registrar.

All Registrars in Spain are members of the Association of Land, Business and Movable Property Registrars of Spain.

The Registrars keep the following registers:

  • Land and Property Registers, referred to generically as ‘Land Registers’. This page deals only with Land Registers.
  • Movable Property Registers.
  • Business Registers.
  • Register of General Contract Conditions.

Useful links

Last update: 12/03/2019

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

Land registers in Member States - France

The 354 French property registers are independent of each other, and there is no interaction between them.

Moreover, in France there is no Internet portal that allows people to consult these registers.

There are no mortgage registers in the region of Alsace-Moselle, in eastern France. In the three administrative areas that make up this region, the land registration service is achieved through the property book.

The whole procedure for consulting the property book is in the process of being amended because the computerisation process, started 20 years ago, has been completed.

Last update: 13/02/2017

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

Please note that the original language version of this page Italian has been amended recently. The language version you are now viewing is currently being prepared by our translators.

Land registers in Member States - Italy

This section provides you with an overview of Italy's land register.

What does the Italian land register offer?

The Link opens in new windowItalian Land Registers are maintained by Agenzia del Territorio, a non-economic public body that operates under the control of the Ministry of Economy and Finance, and also performs cadastral (property) functions.

The registers provide information on deeds of transfer of ownership and other land rights, as well as the raising and writing-off of mortgages.

In addition, the autonomous Link opens in new windowProvince of Trento and Bolzano maintains its own register. This provides mainly cadastral (property) information.

Is access to the Italian land register free of charge?

Access to the registers is subject to the payment of a tax. Thus, the procedure for on-line access requires prior registration with the on-line financial services of the Poste Italiane (Italian Mail System).

The register of the Province of Trento and Bolzano is accessible only to registered users.

How to search the Italian land register

Information maintained in the land registers is organised by subject (natural or juridical person). You can search for information by person, by estate or by deed.

History of the Italian land register

Computerisation of the registered information began in 1986. Following a major reorganisation of the Ministry of Finance, the Italian cadastre and land registers were integrated into a single administration, and electronic transfer began in 1995. The last comprehensive reform of the finance administration created four autonomous tax agencies (including Agenzia del Territorio, which operated from the 1st January 2001). The computerisation of services increased, resulting in the current electronic information system, which was launched at the beginning of 2007.

Last update: 02/04/2019

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

Land registers in Member States - Cyprus

What does the land register offer?

Administration of the land registers is the responsibility of the Link opens in new windowDepartment of Lands and Surveys (Τμήμα Κτηματολογίου και Χωρομετρίας) of the Link opens in new windowMinistry of Interior (Υπουργείο Εσωτερικών). Large parts of the land registers were computerised during the development of the Land Information System (LIS) (Σύστημα Πληροφοριών Γης (ΣΠΓ), which started in September 1995. The LIS comprises four databases: legal database (κτηματολογική βάση), fiscal database (εκτιμητική βάση), digital/cadastral database (γεωγραφική/κτηματική βάση) and survey database (χωρομετρική βάση).

The Cyprus Land Register contains information on the identity of every registered plot of land or unit of immovable property. More importantly, it contains the survey reference of the plot or unit, the location, a description, the surface area, the fiscal value and any charges in rem, encumbrances, deeds of sale, easements, tenancies, restrictive covenants or other related information. It also contains details of the owner or owners, each owner’s share and how and when the property was acquired.

On 14 July 2009, a total of 1,082,660,000 properties in free and occupied Cyprus (i.e. 85.25%) had been recorded in the legal database.

Is access to the land register free of charge?

There is no public access to the land register and Land Information System. Only interested parties can request information on property in which they have a legitimate interest.

The fees paid in order to obtain a search certificate from the Department of Lands and Surveys vary depending on the information requested.

Search certificate

(a) for property registered to a named person, for each village or parish

€ 1.71

(b) for property recorded to a named person, for each village or parish

€ 0.85

(c) for the name of the registered owner of a specified registered property, for each property

€ 0.85

(d) for the history of or charges in rem on a specified property or for any other information for which there is no prescribed fee, for every hour’s search

€ 8.54


How to search the land register

Under current legislation in Cyprus, only interested parties have access to the land registers. Information is provided in the form of a certificate called a ‘search certificate’ (πιστοποιητικό έρευνας). A search certificate is only issued once an application has been filed and the prescribed fee has been paid to the Department of Lands and Surveys. Applications are filed using form Ν.50 and can be filed with any Lands Office (Κτηματολογικό Γραφείο) by any interested party or their agent or attorney. Under section 51A in Chapter 224 of the Immovable Property (Tenure, Registration and Valuation) Law (O περί Ακίνητης Ιδιοκτησίας (Διακατοχή, Εγγραφή και Εκτίμηση) Νόμος), ‘interested party’ means the owner, his universal or specific successors in title, the owner of any trees, buildings or other objects on land which belongs to another and vice versa, a person with any right or interest in the immovable property, a person who satisfies the Director that he is a prospective purchaser or mortgagor, the plaintiff in any action against the owner of the property, a professional valuer who requires certain information for the purpose of valuing certain immovable property in connection with a compulsory purchase and any person not already specified to whom the Director orders that information be furnished.

A search certificate is issued on form Ν.51 by the Lands Office responsible for the register or book in which the information is recorded, signed and stamped with the Department’s seal and handed over or mailed to the applicant.

History of the land register

The database which was the precursor to the current land register was started in the final years of the Ottoman Empire on 21 April 1858, with the adoption of the Ottoman Land Code (Οθωμανικός Κώδικας περί Γαιών). The main purpose of the land registry at the time was to register land, especially state-owned land provided to tenant farmers, and to record sales and transfers of and mortgages on immovable property.

This gave rise to the first registers, in which all daily acts started to be recorded.

New legislation was passed in 1860 requiring mandatory and systematic valuation and registration of all forms of property and the provision of the relevant title deeds (‘Γιοκλάμα’). The land in every village was roughly surveyed and entered in separate registers and interested persons had to pay registration fees in order to obtain a title deed. Persons who failed to pay were not given a title deed and the corresponding entries in the registers were left undated and lapsed from 1943 onwards.

On 4 June 1878, when the Turks ceded their rights over Cyprus to Britain, the British retained the system in force unchanged and they in turn used the ‘land register’ as a means of levying and collecting taxes.

However, in 1890, because of the difficulties caused by having so many different registers, it was decided that they urgently needed to be translated into English and consolidated into one new register. All entries in the old registers were transferred exactly as they stood on the date of transfer to this register, which was prepared for each village separately.

In 1904, a survey of Cyprus was commenced on the basis of the provisions of the Survey for the Purpose of Revenue Law (Ο περί Χωρομετρήσεως για σκοπούς προσόδων Νόμος) No.5 of 1890, in order to make the registration system more reliable and efficient.

While the surveying and mapping of Cyprus (as started in 1904) was under way, the Registration and Valuation of Immovable Property Law (Ο περί Εγγραφής και Εκτιμήσεως Ακινήτου Ιδιοκτησίας Νόμος) No.12 of 1907 was passed for the purpose of registering and surveying all immovable property up to 1929.

Once surveying and mapping had been completed, the immovable property in the land register was valued and registered. The register contained all the information which defined each separate immovable property and the name and interest of every owner. Following registration, the State issued the owner with an official title deed.

Registration of immovable property in Cyprus was completed in 1929. This procedure gave rise to three registers, which are still in use:

  1. An improved type of Land Register (Μητρώο Εγγραφής) containing the details and identity of all property.
  2. Α Tax Register (Φορολογικό Μητρώο), in which every person’s immovable property was recorded by geographical area, together with the total value of the property for land tax purposes.
  3. A Value Schedule (Δελτίο Εκτιμητών), known as form Ν115, describing the property by geographical area and page/plan (surface area, location, beneficiary and value of property).

When the Immovable Property (Tenure, Registration and Valuation) Law Chap. 224 was passed and entered the statute book on 1 September 1946, the Ottoman laws and many of the later colonial laws were repealed, including Law No. 12 of 1907 (which was still on the statute book), and a new, modern basis was introduced for the registration, tenure and valuation of immovable property.

Computerisation of the land register started in 1995 and is progressing well.

Related Links

Link opens in new windowDepartment of Lands and Surveys

Link opens in new windowMinistry of Interior

Last update: 30/04/2015

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

The language version you are now viewing is currently being prepared by our translators.
Please note that the following languages have already been translated.

Land registers in Member States - Latvia

This section provides you with an overview of the Latvian central computerised land register and the Latvian cadastral information system.

There are two registers in Latvia:

  • the cadastral information system (kadastrs) – this is used for registering the individual components of property and for consolidating these components for the purpose of recording the property in the land register, and
  • the land register (zemesgrāmata) – this is used for recording property rights following registration of property in the Latvian cadastral information system.

The land register

What does the Latvian central computerised land register offer?

Link opens in new windowThe Latvian central computerised land register is managed and maintained by the Link opens in new windowCourt Administration (Tiesu administrācija).

Real estate is registered in land registers and the related property rights are recorded there. Land registers are accessible to the public and entries in the register are official. Land registers are managed by the land register divisions of the district or city courts (rajona tiesa or pilsētas tiesa).

The central computerised land register is an electronic data base which stores land registers, record books and alphabetic indexes permanently without amendment, and enables these data to be displayed on a computer screen and printed from a computer.

The central computerised land register focuses on the legal and factual circumstances of real estate and contains information on general issues, including:

  • easements and real estate encumbrances,
  • detached land,
  • owners,
  • the legal basis for title,
  • notifications on insolvency,
  • creditor claims,
  • restrictions,
  • appointment of secondary heirs and inheritance contracts,
  • rights in rem encumbering property and pledge rights.

Land registers consist of portfolios divided into four parts.

The first part is used to register information on:

  • the real estate in question,
  • easements and real estate encumbrances established for the benefit of the real estate,
  • land attached to the real estate,
  • the area covered by the real estate and attached land,
  • detached land and its area,
  • amendments to easements and encumbrances entered in the first part and their deletions.

The second part is used to register information on:

  • the owner of the real estate,
  • the basis for the property rights and the amount for which the real estate was acquired, where this is provided,
  • notifications securing claims to property rights and records of these rights,
  • restrictions on disposing of the real estate and encumbering it with rights in rem,
  • appointment of secondary heirs,
  • inheritance contracts.

The third part is used to register information on:

  • rights in rem encumbering the real estate,
  • notifications serving to establish the aforementioned rights in rem.

The fourth part is used to register information on:

  • pledge rights established with respect to the real estate and the amount of the pledge,
  • notifications establishing the aforementioned pledge rights,
  • amendments to these records and deletions.

Is access to the Latvian central computerised land register free of charge?

The search function for registered real estate is free. However, there is a charge of EUR 4.27 for viewing a portfolio.

The monthly contractual subscription charge is EUR 49.80, and to view a portfolio the charge is EUR 2.85.

How to search the Latvian central computerised land register

You can search for information on Link opens in new windowregistered real estate in the central computerised land register by:

  • portfolio number,
  • property title,
  • cadastral number,
  • property address.

Information on real estate is available from the Court Administration which maintains the central computerised land register, from the land register divisions of district and city courts, and on the internet.

The national authorities and officials to whom the Court Administration provides information from the computerised record books, real estate cases and the index of persons are stipulated by Link opens in new windowCabinet Regulation.

History of the Latvian central computerised land register

This is a significant period in the operational development of the land register, following the concerted move to computerised land registers and the creation of the Latvian central computerised land register. A gradual, targeted transition to a modern electronic land register has been taking place, from the acquisition of the first computers, which were used as typewriters, to the creation of the real estate registration system, the conversion of all land register information from paper to electronic format, and the unification of the data bases of all 27 district or city court land register divisions into a single national land register data base, which is the only data base holding legally recognised information.

1998 was a significant year in the computerisation process, with amendments being made to the Link opens in new windowLand Register Law, supplementing it with a new chapter on the computerised land register. Following these changes a substantial amount of work was needed until, in the first half of 2001, all divisions had gradually been incorporated into the central computerised land register. Parallel to the introduction of the land register registration system, work was undertaken to develop dissemination and improve the website.

The computerised register is maintained with the objective of storing all land register data in a single central data base. Only data contained in this unified data base have legal force and only land register division staff have access to these data. The principles by which land registers are organised have remained unaltered during computerisation – territorial jurisdiction has been retained and, as before, land register divisions accept requests to enter records and adopt decisions on the registration of property and on the recording of related property rights in the land register.

5 July 2001 is regarded as the launch date of the computerised land register. It was on this day that the central computerised register entered into operation and the website Link opens in new windowhttp://www.zemesgramata.lv/ was made available to the general public. The website gives access to information on land register division statistics, news and publications relating to the land register, the addresses and opening hours of land register divisions, fees, the documents required when visiting a land register division and most importantly of all, information on each property entered in the land register, its owner, encumbrances and mortgages.

The Court Administration has been fully responsible for the organisational and technical maintenance of the central computerised land register since 1 April 2004.

By 1 December 2012 the number of real estate portfolios opened in land registers was 1.2 million. Each month an average of 145 000 portfolios are consulted in the central computerised land register.

The cadastral information system

What does the Latvian cadastral information system offer?

The Link opens in new windowLatvian cadastral information system is a unified real estate accounting system that provides, maintains and applies official up-to-date textual and spatial data on real estate located in the Republic of Latvia, units of land, structures, groups of premises and sections of land units making up this real estate, and also its owners, legal holders and users.

It is maintained by the Link opens in new windowState Land Service (Valsts zemes dienests).

Property in Latvia is composed of the following four types:

  • property consisting of land,
  • property consisting of land and structures,
  • property consisting of only a structure,
  • apartments.

As a category of real estate land covers real estate in the broadest sense of the word, i.e. land together with the structures belonging to the owner, as well as property consisting only of undeveloped land. Property in the form of a structure is real estate incorporating only a structure situated on land belonging to a different owner. Property in the form of an apartment in a building consisting of a number of dwellings belonging to several owners is the property of each owner individually, together with a notional part of the respective common property.

Cadastral information consists of:

  • textual data – data on cadastral descriptions, area, cadastral value, encumbrances and restrictions of real estate and associated cadastral objects making up this real estate, and also its owner, legal holders and users.
  • spatial data – cartographic images showing the borders of land units, sections of land units and structures, cadastral descriptions and other information characterising the cadastral objects.

Cadastral data is used for the following purposes:

  • recording real estate rights,
  • establishing real estate transactions,
  • real estate use and planning for the development of real estate,
  • cadastral valuation,
  • administration of real estate tax,
  • national, regional and municipal economic development and territorial planning,
  • land use operations and environmental protection plans,
  • preparing national statistical information,
  • drawing up the book value of land,
  • creating and maintaining geographical information systems,
  • providing for the interests of the owners of other registers and information systems,
  • other purposes.

Is access to the Latvian cadastral information system free of charge?

The Link opens in new windowState Land Service data publication portal provides access free of charge to information such as the cadastral number of a property; the cadastral description of a land unit, structure or group of premises; the address of a land unit, structure or group of premises; the property title; the land register portfolio number (where property rights have been recorded in the land register); or a visual representation of the location of a land unit or structure using a symbol on a satellite map (M 1:50 000).

The charge for viewing more detailed cadastral information (without a subscription) is EUR 2.85 for each property viewed, including its cadastral components.

The information on the portal is also available to authorised users who have signed a subscription contract. Information on setting up a contract with the State Land Service is available Link opens in new windowhere.

How to search the Latvian cadastral information system

The cadastral information system can be used to find property, land units, structures and groups of premises. Further information on using the search function is available Link opens in new windowhere.

History of the Latvian cadastral information system

The modern-day cadastral information system dates back to 1992. Its launch coincided with the land reform, which was an essential part of Latvia's return to independence and transition to a market economy. The rights of individuals to own land were officially renewed in 1993.

The content of the Latvian cadastral information system has gradually increased. In the first four years of its re-establishment in the early 1990s only land units, land holdings and land use were registered. In 1996 data on structures also began to be registered and from 2000 the full-scale registration of apartments began.

In its first eight years of operation the cadastral information system was devoted mainly to gathering data and the primary registration of this data. Since 2001 the main priority has been to keep information up to date and to ensure its quality.

100 % of national territory is registered in the cadastral information system and registrations are managed in digital format.

Last update: 04/01/2016

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

Land registers in Member States - Lithuania

This section provides you with an overview of Lithuania's land register.

What does the Lithuanian land register offer?

You can find Immovable property – including land, buildings and separate premises – in the Link opens in new windowregister of real property of Lithuania (Lietuvos nekilnojamojo turto registras). Both factual and legal data are available.

Factual data on property consists of the following types of information:

  • Area
  • Height
  • Volume
  • Year of construction
  • Owner name

Legal data on property includes:

  • Agreements of joint ownership
  • Court rulings
  • Easement
  • Mortgages

The register is maintained by the state enterprise centre of registers (Registrų centras) and is supervised by the Ministry of Justice.

You can find further information on the websites of the Link opens in new windowAdministrator of the real property register of Lithuania (Nekilnojamojo turto registro tvarkytojas) and the Link opens in new windowreal property register (Nekilnojamojo turto registras).

Is access to the land register of Lithuania free of charge?

Data on the real property register is available by payment only.

How to search the land register of Lithuania

You can search the register for the following fields:

  • The address of the property
  • Unique number of the property
  • Code of a legal person (owner)
  • Personal code of a natural person (owner). Search by the personal code of natural person (owner) is restricted.

History of the land register of Lithuania

The register itself was established in 1998, whereas data since 1958 is collected in the register.

Related Links

Link opens in new windowState enterprise Centre of registers (valstybės įmonė Registrų centras)

Link opens in new windowEuropean Land Information (Europos žemės informacijos tarnyba)

Last update: 18/02/2019

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

The language version you are now viewing is currently being prepared by our translators.
Please note that the following languages have already been translated.

Land registers in Member States - Luxembourg

This section of the Portal provides a brief introduction to Luxembourg's land register. An electronic version of the land register does not yet exist.

What does Luxembourg's land register offer?

Luxembourg's land register is owned and maintained by the Link opens in new windowLand register and Topography Authority of the State of Luxembourg.

The register provides the following types of information:

  1. A cadastral map;
  2. A database containing alphanumeric content on:
  • land parcels,
  • owners,
  • land use, and
  • area.

Information is available in Luxembourgish, French, and German.

Is access to Luxembourg's land register free of charge?

Firstly, an electronic version of the land register does not yet exist. Secondly a fee is payable for access to the paper version.

History of Luxembourg's land register

The land register was established in 1820.

Last update: 20/12/2018

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

Please note that the original language version of this page Hungarian has been amended recently. The language version you are now viewing is currently being prepared by our translators.

Land registers in Member States - Hungary

This section provides you with an overview of Hungary's land register.

What services does the Hungarian Land Registry provide?

The Hungarian Land Register is managed by the Link opens in new windowMinistry of Rural Development (Vidékfejlesztési Minisztérium) and the Land Offices (Földhivatal) of Hungary.

The official website of the Land Offices of Hungary (magyarországi földhivatalok) provides information on the countrywide network of Hungarian land offices, and gives access to the entire network of land administration institutions, with details on:

  • Their tasks
  • Their duties and services they provide
  • New and important projects

You can download administrative forms and read about our electronic services and the conditions for accessing the system on the web. The relevant legislation can be found here, too.

Is access to the Hungarian land registry free of charge?

Registered users (public administrative bodies, banks, lawyers, public notaries, municipal authorities, real estate agents, etc.) have been able to access the Link opens in new windowonline services (TAKARNET) of the Land Offices of Hungary since 2003. Data is provided subject to a fee, in line with relevant legislation.

The Online Land Office (Földhivatal Online) service was launched in June 2011, which citizens can access directly through the Government Portal using their central ‘client gateway’ (ügyfélkapu) ID, and where they may use online services subject to a fee, in the same way as registered users.

Clients of the Online Land Office can access a limited range of data free of charge. The free service, however, encompasses only descriptive data on the properties (the first section of the property sheet (tulajdoni lap)). The database can be searched by parcel number (helyrajzi szám) or the address of the property. Registered users and citizens can access these online services 24 hours a day via the internet.

How to search the Hungarian land registry

In general, you can carry out a search based on:

  • Parcel number;
  • Parcel number interval; or
  • Address of the property.

Users with special rights (police, investigating authorities, court executors, public notaries in inheritance cases) can search based on the name and personal data of the owner and/or authorised person.

History of the Hungarian Land Registry

The official name of the legal and administrative system managing the registry of real estate in Hungary is the 'unified land registry system' (egységes ingatlan-nyilvántartási rendszer). It is considered 'unified' because cadastral mapping data and legal data (telekkönyv, ‘Grundbuch’) have been managed in an integrated form both legally and institutionally since 1971. A single institutional network comprising all land offices is responsible for registering legal transactions and changes in land registry maps, providing data and performing other tasks related to land and built property. Hungary’s unified, title-based land registry system was the first of its kind in Europe.

The Hungarian system serves multiple purposes, given that besides its activities covering the full spectrum of land registry it carries out a number of other tasks, such as the establishment and maintenance of the geodesic control point network, topographic mapping, land conservation, land lease registration and the maintenance of administrative boundaries.

This complex public database containing information on agricultural land and immovable property, that is, on some of the most important components of economic life, agriculture and credit circulation, is managed by the land administration in an integrated manner and covers the entire administrative territory of Hungary. The aim of the system is to help enforce the right to property, a healthy environment, freedom of enterprise and competition, and to officially register natural and artificial landmarks by providing a uniform and publicly authenticated land registration system and spatial data infrastructure.

The general aim is the official registration and management of data on all land and other property, while ensuring the security of ownership rights and other entitlements relating to property by providing a uniform and publicly authenticated land registration system and infrastructure.

In addition, the unified land registry system has two specific goals. The land registry’s legal objective is to protect real-estate-related rights and official documents, while at the same time providing certainty for bona fide owners and holders and promoting the profitable use of real estate. On the other hand, the system’s economic aim is to serve as a uniform basis for planning and for establishing financial obligations, to facilitate governance and property investment through the provision of statistical data, and to provide services to society as a whole.

Related links

Government Portal (Link opens in new windowKormányzati portál)

Official website of the Land Offices of Hungary (Link opens in new windowA magyarországi földhivatalok hivatalos honlapja)

Last update: 06/04/2017

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

Land registers in Member States - Malta

This section provides you with an overview of Malta's land register.

What does the Maltese land register offer?

The electronic register of the Maltese Land Registry Department is only accessible to Land Registry employees and members of two other government departments who have read-only rights.

The information contained in the register does not yet cover the whole of the Maltese Islands and is still being compiled, with the possibility of being provided online in the future. However, clients may request searches of the register by completing the relevant form. General queries can also be addressed to the Director of the Malta Land Registry, Casa Bolino, 116 West Street, Valletta VLT 1535.

You can also call on +35621239777 or send an e-mail to: Link opens in new windowland.registry@gov.mt

Is access to the Maltese land register free of charge?

No access to the Maltese land register is subject to a payment. Each search costs €4.66.

How to search the Maltese land register

Clients may request searches of the register by completing the relevant form.

History of the Maltese land register

The register was created pursuant to the Land Registration Act, Cap. 296 of the Laws of Malta in 1982.

Last update: 21/12/2016

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

Land registers in Member States - Netherlands

This section provides you with an overview of the Dutch land register.

What does the Dutch Land register offer?

The Link opens in new windowDutch Land Register is owned and maintained by the Kadaster (Cadastre, Land Registry and Mapping Agency), a public authority responsible for registering rights and interests affecting any real estate (including land and buildings) and the specifications of these (e.g. size).

Is access to the Dutch land register free of charge?

No, a fee is charged. For more information, please visit the website of the Link opens in new windowKadaster.

How to search the Dutch land register

Professionals in the Netherlands who have subscribed to the Dutch Land Register can search it using the following search parameters:

  • Name of the owner or person related to the property
  • Address
  • Postcode
  • Cadastral identifier
  • Map
  • Place map
  • Deed number
  • Name of the property.

All information is displayed in Dutch and billing is done on a monthly basis.

Subscribed professional users in countries participating to Link opens in new windowEULIS (the European Land Information Service) can search the Dutch Land Register using the following parameters:

  • Address
  • Postcode
  • Cadastral identifier
  • Map
  • Place map.

All information is displayed in English; billing is done through the national land registry concerned.

Individuals can search the Dutch Land Register using the following parameters:

  • Address
  • Postcode

All information (though less than that provided to professional users) is displayed in Dutch and payment may be made by Mastercard, Visa Electron, Visa, American Express, Diners Club, iDEAL or internet cheque.

History of the Dutch land register

Information is available on all property from the date of the foundation of the Dutch Kadaster (1832).

During the period 1981 – 1985 the Dutch Kadaster placed all information then held into computerised systems. Information dating from 1985 onwards is available online. Historical information (1832-1985) can be accessed in digital archives by the Kadaster's employees.

Related Links

Link opens in new windowEuropean Land Information Service, Link opens in new windowCadastre (Land Registry and Mapping Agency)

Last update: 06/02/2015

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

The language version you are now viewing is currently being prepared by our translators.
Please note that the following languages have already been translated.

Land registers in Member States - Austria

This section of the Portal provides an overview of Austria's land register.

What does the Austrian land register offer?

The land register (Grundbuch) provides answers to both legal and factual questions. It contains the records of all legally binding Austrian property transactions.

The land register and its electronic document archive can be consulted via the Link opens in new windowAustrian Justice homepage.

Is access to the land register free of charge?

For access a small fee has to be paid. To gain access, contact one of the access providers or ‘clearing houses’ (Verrechnungsstellen) listed in the Grundbuch section of the Link opens in new windowAustrian Justice homepage.

How to search the land register

By entering the name of the municipality (Gemeinde) and the number of the plot (the Einlagezahl or ‘EZ’) or the number of the property (Grundstücksnummer), the following information may be obtained from the database:

  • excerpts from the land register,
  • excerpts from the register maps,
  • copies of maps.

This information includes all recently entered data. Data that has been deleted may also be obtained on request provided it was entered after the conversion to the electronic register. Older data is available on paper only.

It is not possible to obtain information on persons. For information on persons, interested parties must apply to the land register office (Grundbuchsabteilung) of any district court (Bezirksgericht), showing that they have a legal interest in obtaining the information.

History of the land register

The old land register recorded and stored information on paper. Between 1980 and 1992, the records were transferred to the land register database.

Last update: 15/06/2018

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

Please note that the original language version of this page Polish has been amended recently. The language version you are now viewing is currently being prepared by our translators.

Land registers in Member States - Poland

This section provides you with an overview of Poland's land register.

What does the Polish land register offer?

The Polish land register (rejestr ksiąg wieczystych) is kept in accordance with the Land Registers and Mortgages Act.

Under the Act, land registers are kept with a view to establishing the legal status of real estate. They contain the following information:

  • designation of the estate (including the parcels making it up);
  • details of the owner(s) of the estate or the holder of perpetual usufruct;
  • information on other parties' rights in rem;
  • the type and amount of the mortgage charged against the estate.

Land registers are public documents and anyone may consult them. As of June 2010 Link opens in new windowa land register can be accessed electronically by entering its number.

In addition, anyone may obtain a copy of a land register or a certificate indicating that a land register has been closed.

Is access to the Polish land register free of charge?

There is no charge for consulting land registers.

A charge is made for issuing a copy of a land register or a certificate indicating that a land register has been closed.

Last update: 10/09/2014

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

The language version you are now viewing is currently being prepared by our translators.
Please note that the following languages have already been translated.

Land registers in Member States - Portugal

This page provides an overview of Portuguese land registry.

Land register (Registo Predial)

The land register is kept by the Land Registry Offices, under the direction of the Land Registrars, which are part of the Instituto dos Registos e do Notariado (Institute of Records and Notaries). These offices are spread across Portugal, in each municipality but their competence is not limited according to their geographical location and they can perform acts relating to any immovable property in Portugal.

The main purpose of the land register is to provide information on a property's legal status and guarantee the security of the property transaction. As a rule, it is compulsory for all matters relating to titles since 21 July 2008.

The final register constitutes a presumption of the existence of a right to the property that belongs to the registered holder under the precise terms set out in the register.

Situations requiring an entry in the land register:

a) legal facts giving rise to the establishment, recognition, acquisition or modification of rights of ownership, usufruct, use and habitation, superficies or easement;

b) legal facts giving rise to the establishment or the modification of apartment ownership (propriedade horizontal) and the right of periodic residence;

c) legal facts which annul (convenções anuláveis) or cancel (convenções resolúveis) the rights referred to in paragraph a);

d) land alteration resulting from parcelling out, setting up of co-ownership and re-parcelling out, as well as related changes;

e) mere possession;

d) promise of disposal (alienação) or encumbrance (oneração), preference agreements (pactos de preferência) and testamentary dispositions, where these have come into force, as well as the assignment of contractual status resulting from these situations;

g) transfer (cessão) of property to creditors:

h) a mortgage, transfer or modification thereof, transfer of the ranking of the respective entry and rent assignation (consignação de rendimentos);

i) the transfer of credits guaranteed by mortgage or rent assignation, where it is necessary to transfer the guarantee;

j) assignment of real estate as the guarantee of insurance companies' technical reserves, as well as the guarantee of employers' responsibility;

l) financial leasing and conveyancing thereof;

m) leasing lasting more than six years and conveyancing thereof or sublets, except for agricultural leases;

n) seizure and declaration of insolvency;

o) pledge, seizure, attachment and inventory of assets guaranteed by mortgage or rent assignation and any other acts or measures that affect these assets;

p) establishment of 'appanage' (apanágio) and its modifications;

q) encumbrance (ónus) of any reduction of donations subject to restoration;

r) encumbrance of a rent-controlled house (casa de renda limitada) or of economic revenue on buildings thus categorised;

s) encumbrance of payment of annuities provided for in cases of agricultural support;

t) renouncement of the indemnity, in the event of expropriation, for the increase in value resulting from work carried out on immovable property situated in areas near national roads or covered by municipal improvement plans;

u) any other restrictions on the right of ownership, any other burdens and any other situations legally requiring an entry in the register;

v) concession of property to the public domain and conveyancing thereof, where a mortgage on the right conceded is to be registered;

x) legal facts which affect the termination of recorded rights, encumbrances or burdens.

z) title establishing a tourism undertaking and its modifications.

The following actions also require an entry in the land register, as well as final decisions following the issue of a final judgment, the principal or alternative object of which is:

a) recognition, establishment, modification or termination of some of the rights referred to in the previous paragraph, as well as revocatory actions;

b) reorganisation, declaration of nullity or invalidation of an entry or of its cancellation;

c) procedures of which the object is to decree the attachment and the inventory, as well as any other measures which affect the free disposal of property, and the respective measures decreed.

Principles of the land register

Principle of enforceability against third parties

Facts requiring an entry in the register, even if not registered, may be cited between the parties or their heirs, with the exception of the establishment of a mortgage, of which the effectiveness between the parties depends on an entry being registered.

However, situations requiring an entry only become effective vis-à-vis third parties from the date of the respective entry.

Principle of priority

The right first registered prevails over subsequent entries relating to the same property, in the order of the dates of the entries, and, on a same date, of the time of the corresponding submissions.

Principle of legality

The viability of the request for an entry is assessed against applicable legal provisions, the documents submitted and previous entries. Special attention is paid to checking the identity of the building, the legitimacy of the interested parties, the formal regularity of the titles and the validity of the acts contained therein.

Principle of chain of title

The final entry of establishment of burdens by legal acts depends on the previous registration of the properties in the name of whom the burden applies.

In the event that there is an entry concerning the property for acquisition or recognition of a right which may be transferred or for mere possession, the respective title holder must intervene in order for the new final entry to be drawn up, unless the situation is a consequence of another previous entry.

General rule for the deadline for making an entry

As a rule, the entry must be requested within 30 days from the date on which the facts have been registered or from the date of payment of the tax obligations where such payment has to take place after the establishment of the title (titulação) (in cases of distribution or donations).

Other characteristics of the registry procedure

The principle of legitimate interest (princípio da instância) applies to the land register, i.e. the entry is made at the request of someone who is in a legitimate position to do so. The following have a legitimate interest in requesting an entry in the register: active and passive subjects of the related legal relationship, and, in general, whoever has an interest therein or has an obligation to promote such an interest.

The request may be made in person, electronically, by fax or by post.

Entries will only be made in the register where they are substantiated by documents. The facts relating to buildings are, as a rule, recorded in a deed certified by a public official (escritura pública) or by a specific authenticated document (document authenticated by a notary, lawyer, solicitor or land registrar and uploaded to the Predial Online website).

A compulsory mechanism is in place to provide missing information, or, if the entry cannot be made as required, the registrar contacts the person requesting the entry to collect all the necessary documents, in order to avoid the entry being rejected or being given a provisional nature.

The registrar makes the entry within 10 days from the date of the submission.

Should the entry be rejected or made provisionally due to some remaining doubts, the requester is informed by reasoned order and may lodge an administrative contentious appeal to the registrar's hierarchical superior or appeal through the courts.

Fees

The Regulation on fees for records and notaries (Regulamento Emolumentar dos Registos e do Notariado - Decree-Law No 322-A/2001 of 14 December 2001) sets outs fees for the land register.

Access to register information

Further to paper copies of certificates, the information can easily be accessed online at http://www.predialonline.pt/ by means of an electronic certificate. There is up-to-date information on the legal situation of buildings and on pending applications for registration. Access is based on a yearly subscription plan and costs €15. The application must be made on the basis of the building's description number or its tax number. Following payment, a certification code provides access to the information.

Other services

In Portugal two services are available in relation to land registers: Predial Online and Casa Pronta.

Predial Online

On this site, privately owned authenticated documents evidencing legal acts and mortgage cancellation documents may be uploaded. Notices about the transfer of buildings to entities with a legal right of preference (so that they can announce their intention to exercise such rights or not) are also accepted. It is also possible to consult notifications published in respect of buildings under the special procedures for justification and correction.

Entries may also be requested, which will require that the interested parties authenticate themselves by means of a digital certificate.

Is access to Predial Online free of charge?

Much of the Predial Online website is available free of charge. However, Regulamento Emolumentar dos Registos e do Notariado (Decree-Law No 322-A/2001 of 14 December 2001) lays down charges for access to some sections of the website, which are reserved for use by authenticated users. Authentication is done by means of a digital certificate, and relates particularly to online registers (application and consultation of the status of the application) and document deposit (deposit and consultation).

Information available in the Predial Online register

The website provides access to information and certificates relating to immovable property recorded in the Portuguese land register.

Casa Pronta

The Casa Pronta service provides an one-stop service, making it possible to carry out all the necessary formalities relating to the purchase and sale, donation, exchange, dation in payment (dação pagamento), of urban, mixed or rural buildings, with or without a bank credit, to the transfer of a home purchase bank loan from one bank to another or to the taking out of a loan against the mortgage on a house. It is also possible to use the Casa Pronta service to establishment apartment ownership (propriedade horizontal).

The first step of the procedures are with the land registry (conservatória) or a bank, which can access the website using a username and password. This process can be followed at any time.

The website offers any individual the opportunity to give notice of the transfer of a building, so that entities with legal rights of preference can announce their intention to exercise these.

Is access to Casa Pronta free of charge?

Regulamento Emolumentar dos Registos e do Notariado (Decree-Law No 322-A/2001 of 14 December 2001) lays down charges for access to the procedure.

For a fee of €15, the Web Casa Pronta website offers any individual the opportunity to give notice of the transfer of a building.

This allows entities with the legal right of preference to announce their intention to exercise this. However, in the latter case, access to the site is restricted.

Furthermore, only the following entities have access to the Web Casa Pronta:

  • Banks
  • Land registry
  • Entities receiving legal rights of preference.

Access is obtained by entering a username and password.

No access restrictions apply to announcements to exercise legal rights of preference, which may be done free of charge.

Useful links

Link opens in new windowPredial Online

Link opens in new windowCasa Pronta

Last update: 29/12/2017

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

Please note that the original language version of this page Romanian has been amended recently. The language version you are now viewing is currently being prepared by our translators.

Land registers in Member States - Romania

There is no electronic national land registry currently available in Romania.

Information on land registration however is available from the website of the Link opens in new windowNational Agency for Cadastre and Land Registration.

Last update: 10/06/2013

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

Land registers in Member States - Slovenia

This section provides you with an overview of Slovenia's land register.

What does the Slovenian Land Register offer?

The Link opens in new windowSlovenian Land Register contains the legal facts relating to properties, such as owners, mortgages, and easements.

A Link opens in new windowLand Cadastre is also available, which focuses on the factual circumstances of properties.

The Land Register is owned and managed by the Supreme Court of the Republic of Slovenia.

Is access to the Slovenian Land Register free of charge?

Public electronic access to the Land Register is available on the e-Sodstvo portalLink opens in new windowhttps://evlozisce.sodisce.si/esodstvo/index.html . Access to data is free of charge but it is necessary to register beforehand.

Public access to the Land Register is also available at all local courts in Slovenia, notaries and administrative units, where individuals may obtain a certified copy of an extract from the Land Register. A charge is made for certified extracts from the Land Register.

Searching the Slovenian Land Register

You can access data by entering the following search criteria:

  • cadastral municipality and parcel number
  • cadastral municipality, building number and individual part number
  • identification number of the property (property ID)
  • identification number of the right (right ID).

History of the Slovenian Land Register

The new electronic portal has been available since 2011. Before that, information was accessible in the old ‘land book’.

Related links

Link opens in new windowhttp://www.sodisce.si/javne_knjige/zemljiska_knjiga/
Last update: 27/03/2018

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

Please note that the original language version of this page Slovak has been amended recently. The language version you are now viewing is currently being prepared by our translators.

Land registers in Member States - Slovakia

This section provides you with an overview of Slovakia's land register.

What does the Slovak Land Register offer?

The Link opens in new windowSlovak Land Register portal (Slovenský katastrálny portál) is hosted by the Link opens in new windowGeodesy, Cartography and Cadastre Authority of the Slovak Republic (Úrad geodésie, kartografie a katastra Slovenskej republiky), and a central government authority for land registers. The portal is operated and maintained by Geographic and Cartographic Institute Bratislava (Geodetický a kartografický ústav Bratislava).

The Portal provides legal and factual information about real estate ownership. It is updated once a week using data supplied by the respective land register offices. Search is available in Slovak and in English. The portal provides:

  • selected data from the geographic information file - cadastral maps,
  • selected data from the descriptive information file - information about parcels, structures, flats, non-residential premises and ownership documents,
  • register of municipalities, register of cadastral districts,
  • statistical reports,
  • aggregate values by type of land,
  • information about the status of proceedings before the land register,
  • notifications of contemplated registration applications.

An ownership document (list vlastníctva) provides information about the property, its owners and the rights attaching to the property, as well as additional information on property-related rights. More specifically, it contains:

  • a unique number,
  • the name of the district in which the particular property is located,
  • the name of the relevant municipality,
  • the name of the cadastral district.

It consists of 3 parts:

Part A – Physical assets, which lists all the properties subject to property rights, detailing:

  • acreage,
  • types of parcels,
  • a code denoting the permitted use of the land,
  • relevance to the built-up area of the municipality,
  • other explanatory details on matters related to part A.

Part B – Owners or other entitled persons, detailing:

  • first name,
  • surname,
  • maiden name, or the name of the corporate owner or other entitled persons,
  • date of birth,
  • birth registration number, or the organisation’s registration number,
  • co-ownership shares,
  • title deed: acquisition under a public document or some other document,
  • address of permanent residence or registered office,
  • other explanatory details on matters related to part B.

Part C – Encumbrances, detailing:

  • easements (the content of the easement, the designation of the person deriving benefit from the easement, including the record of the easement in this person’s ownership document),
  • rights of lien (the designation of the lien creditor) and first option, if these are to have the effects of real rights (identification of beneficiaries of first option rights),
  • other rights, if agreed upon as real rights,
  • other explanatory details on matters related to part C,
  • additions/corrections entered.

Part C does not include data on debt amounts.

Is access to the Slovak Land Register free of charge?

Information available at the Land Register portal is provided free of charge for everybody.

History of the Slovak Land Register

The Land Register portal has been in service since 2004. Since September 2007, information provided by the portal is free of charge by law.

Related links

Link opens in new windowwebsite of Land Register portal, Link opens in new windowwebsite of the Slovak Geodesy, Cartography and Cadastre Authority

Last update: 29/05/2018

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

Land registers in Member States - Finland

This section provides you with an overview of the Finnish land register.

What does the Finnish land register offer?

The Link opens in new windowFinnish land register is owned and maintained by the National Land Survey.

The register focuses both on the legal circumstances of a property, such as the legal regime, and on the factual circumstances, such as the property owner's name. The National Land Information System contains all the information entered in the Finnish cadastral register and the land register, which records titles, mortgages and other encumbrances.

Cadastral map data is provided by the National Land Survey of Finland, and 86 municipalities maintain cadastral map registers for the areas covered by their town plans. Maintaining the land register will be the responsibility of the district courts until 31st December 2009 and, from 1st January 2010, of the National Land Survey of Finland. The system is used by all who need up-to-date cadastral data on a regular basis, such as banks, various authorities, real estate agents and notaries.

Is access to Finnish land register free of charge?

No, access is not free.

How to search the Finnish land register

Searches available

Search by map, by register unit identifier or name, address, administrative unit (municipal, suburb/village) and enterprise identifier.

Information available

You can find information on the:

  • Ownership
  • Title
  • Mortgages and encumbrances,
  • Leasehold
  • Easements
  • Land survey information.

Attributed data of register unit, registered owner and owner’s address, and possible restrictions of tenure as well as owners of registered part transfers; mortgages, easements and encumbrances on registered unit, registered leasehold.

Products available

  • Excerpt of cadastre
  • Title certificate
  • Certificate of mortgages and encumbrances
  • Certificate of a leasehold
  • Excerpt of transfer of part and different printouts of maps.

Information is provided on how users can search the register (e.g. property address).

History of the Finnish land register

The register has been maintained since 1700.

Related Links

Link opens in new windowNational Land Survey of Finland, EULIS website

Last update: 30/06/2019

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

The language version you are now viewing is currently being prepared by our translators.
Please note that the following languages have already been translated.

Land registers in Member States - Sweden

This section provides you with an overview of Sweden's Real Property Register of which the land register is one of five integrated sections.

What does the Swedish land register offer?

The Real Property Register, of which the land register is part, is a multi-purpose national register which provides information on:

  • Real property and joint property units
  • Administrative divisions
  • Location addresses
  • Geometric area of the property/cadastral maps
  • Ownership
  • Mortgages and mortgage deeds
  • Easements and usufructs
  • Plans and land use regulations
  • Ancient monuments
  • Land parcelling measures or the like
  • Site leasehold rights
  • History
  • Buildings
  • Property taxation information.

The land registry is managed by the Swedish mapping, cadastral and land registration authority (Lantmäteriet).

Is access to the Swedish and register free of charge?

There is no charge for information supplied during personal visits or by phone. Information can also be requested under the principle of access to public documents. There is a charge for electronic access to the register, apart from the Link opens in new windowMin fastighet (my property) service, which is free.

How to search the Swedish land register

A number of electronic search services are directly available via the Authority's website or via the Authority's agents (who are listed on the Authority's website). Most services require a subscription. Access is via online services or by selection and processing. The Authority's website also offers the service

  • Link opens in new windowMin fastighet (my property), which contains detailed information which is only available to the owner of the property.

It is also possible to access information from other countries via the European Land Information Service EULIS.

History of the Swedish land register

The establishment of the electronic register started in 1970. Full information storage was completed in 1995. The Real Property Register’s technical environment and the means of access to it have been gradually developed. There are plans to introduce a brand new technological platform for the land register. Work in this direction has begun and will continue over the coming years.

Useful Links

Link opens in new windowEuropean Land Information Service (Eulis)

Last update: 28/01/2013

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

Land registers in Member States - England and Wales

This section provides you with an introduction to the land register of England and Wales.

What does the land register of England and Wales offer?

We register the ownership of land and property in England and Wales. Our vision is ‘Your land and property rights: guaranteed and protected.’

Our values are:

  • we give assurance
  • we have integrity
  • we drive innovation
  • we are professional

Land Registry provides the vital function of giving assurance and confidence to the property market, with the Register underpinning property ownership worth over £4 trillion across England and Wales including over £1 trillion of mortgages. Land Registry has over 150 years’ experience of maintaining the Register and has evolved to become increasingly efficient, with 99% of our information and 73% of our registration services being submitted online. We are on a transformational journey to create a fully digitised Register building a contemporary digital platform for land and property to support the Register and provide a modern, efficient service for customers.

Is access to the land register of England and Wales free of charge?

A statutory fee is payable for each service. There is no sign up fee for online access and most online services cost less than services by post.

How to search the land register of England and Wales

Online access:

Business e-Services allow business users to submit applications to register land and property, or to request a search of the index map online. Business e-services users can also use our free MapSearch to instantly:

  • check if land and property in England or Wales is registered
  • get title numbers
  • find out if tenure is freehold or leasehold

Business e-service customers must fulfil conditions of use, register as a user and have a variable direct debit account with a UK bank or building society.Link opens in new window Login to business e-services.

Find a Property service is designed for members of the public and also used by small businesses. They can search by address to find the land or property owner, how far its general boundaries extend and whether it’s at risk of flooding. They must register as users and pay by credit or debit card. Login to Link opens in new windowFind a Property.

Copies of registers and title plans obtained through Business e-Services are ‘official copies’ and so are admissible as evidence in a court of law. MapSearch does not provide indemnity provisions for information supplied.

Copies of registers and title plans obtained through the Find a Property service are not official copies.

Postal access:

You can apply for official copies of the register and title plan by post using Link opens in new windowforms OC1 (for the register) and OC2 (for documents). These forms are available free of charge by post or online from Land Registry. Official copies are admissible as evidence in a court of law.

If you are unable to find property information online, you can also send a ‘search of the index map’ (form SIM) by post to discover if the land is registered, and if so to obtain a title number. A fee set by the current Land Registry Fee Order is payable.

The Land Charge registers can be searched by post, or online through business e-services using Form Link opens in new windowK15 or (to search for bankruptcy entries only) Link opens in new windowK16

Last update: 13/09/2016

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

Land registers in Member States - Northern Ireland

This section provides you with an overview of the land register of Northern Ireland.

What does the land register of Northern Ireland offer?

Link opens in new windowhttps://www.finance-ni.gov.uk/land-property-services-lps provides content on the rules, regulations and guidance that govern the operation of the various registers.

Link opens in new windowhttps://www.finance-ni.gov.uk/articles/landweb-direct-access

The service provides:

  • Search facilities
  • Owner name and charges affecting property
  • A facility that allows you to download and print information held in the register.

Is access to the land register of Northern Ireland free of charge?

Yes, access to LandWeb is free of charge for authorised users. Users who wish to access search facilities must register for the service and are, in most instances, required to pay fees to access and download data.

How to search the land register of Northern Ireland

Search facilities include access to maps of title, title extent and title documentation. This database includes owner names and any charges affecting property. Full instructions are contained within the LandWeb Direct web pages. https://www.landwebni.gov.uk/help/WebHelp/LWD

E-registration facilities allow registered users to fill out various registration forms, calculate fees and submit information electronically. Full instructions are contained within the E-Registration pages. https://www.landwebni.gov.uk/Downloads/ERegistrationUserGuide.pdf

History of the land register of Northern Ireland

The land registry came into existance in 1891, prior to that date ownership of land was recorded in the Registry of Deeds, which was established in 1706. Land and Protpery Services administers three registires: the land registry, deeds registry and statutory charge registry.

Related Links

Link opens in new windowLand & Property Services – Land Registers

Link opens in new windowEuropean Land Information Service

Last update: 25/02/2019

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.

Land registers in Member States - Scotland

This section provides you with an overview of the land register of Scotland.

What does the Land Register of Scotland offer?

The Land Register of Scotland is one of 20 public registers held and maintained by the Link opens in new windowRegisters of Scotland (RoS). The primary aim of RoS is to ensure the integrity of the registers under its control and provide public access to them. The Keeper of the Registers of Scotland is responsible for leading the organisation and delivering the strategic objectives agreed by the Board. The strategic objectives are aligned to the Scottish Government's purpose, national outcomes, programme for government, and economic and digital strategies.

The Land Register of Scotland is a digital, map-based public register of rights in land, backed by a state guarantee. It provides a once and for all examination of title deeds to a plot of land, consolidating various pieces of information and resulting in the production of a title sheet.

A title sheet contains the following information:

  • a description of the right in land by reference to the cadastral map (the map showing the totality of registered geospatial data in Scotland);
  • the name and designation of the proprietor of the property;
  • charges over the property; and
  • real burdens or conditions that affect the property.

The Land Register is gradually replacing the General Register of Sasines (the Sasine Register), another register maintained by RoS. The Sasine Register was established in the early 17th century, and is a chronological register of deeds relating to property.

To date, 68% of land and property titles in Scotland have been registered in the Land Register.  This represents approximately 33% of Scottish land. RoS is working towards completing the Land Register by 2024.. Completion of the Land Register is being achieved via three mechanisms:

  • voluntary registration;
  • new registration triggers (such as closure of the Sasine Register to standard securities (mortgages); and
  • Keeper-induced registration (KIR).

KIR was introduced by the Land Registration etc (Scotland) Act 2012 (the 2012 Act) and provides RoS with the power to move titles from the Sasine Register to the Land Register without an application being made by the owner. The completion of the Land Register will allow for easier, faster and cheaper property transactions.

RoS also administers two smaller registers relating to specific types of interest in land: the Crofting Register and the Register of Community Interests in Land.

Crofting is a form of agricultural land tenure particular to Scotland, governed by specific statute and, since November 2012, capable of registration in the Crofting Register.

The Register of Community Interests in Land was established by statute in 2003, and contains statutory pre-emptive rights to buy land.

Is access to the Land Register of Scotland free of charge?

A small fee is charged for basic online searches of both the Sasine and Land Registers. Copies of title sheets or deeds from these registers may also be obtained for a fee.

How to search the land register of Scotland

Regardless of the format of the request, searches of the Land Register may be conducted through:

  • the name of the proprietor;
  • the address of the subjects of search;
  • the title number of the property; or
  • the cadastral map.

Searches of the Sasine Register, Crofting Register and RCIL may also be conducted against a number of searchable fields.

ScotLIS

Scotland's Land and Information Service (ScotLIS) is provided by RoS and allows everyone to access publically available data about land and property directly from the Land Register.  ScotLIS offers information about:

  • when a property was last sold;
  • how much a property sold for;
  • whether a property is registered  in the Land Register;
  • what the title number of a property is;
  • the boundaries of a property on an Ordnance Survey map;

ScotLIS is continuing to evolve and will eventually allow access to a wide variety of data held by public sector partners.

History of the Registers of Scotland

Scotland has maintained public registers for approximately seven hundred years, with registers relating to land being kept in Edinburgh Castle from the 13th century onwards. The Sasine Register is the world's first national public register of property ownership rights, established by an Act of the (old) Link opens in new windowParliament of Scotland in 1617, and has provided a public record of rights in property since that time.

The shift from a register of deeds to a register of titles began some eighty years before the Land Register itself was established by statute in 1979. The Land Register was introduced gradually, starting in 1981, and encompassed the whole of Scotland by2003. The introduction of the Land Register along with a system of state guaranteed title to land removed significant risks and uncertainties inherent to property transactions prior to establishment of this register.

The 2012 Act commenced in December 2014. The main purpose of the Act was to reform and restate the law on the registration of rights to land in Scotland, realigning registration law with property law.

Related Links

Link opens in new windowRegisters of Scotland

Last update: 25/04/2019

The national language version of this page is maintained by the respective Member State. The translations have been done by the European Commission service. Possible changes introduced in the original by the competent national authority may not be yet reflected in the translations. The European Commission accepts no responsibility or liability whatsoever with regard to any information or data contained or referred to in this document. Please refer to the legal notice to see copyright rules for the Member State responsible for this page.